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  • Let's Talk Mob Rules

    Okay, this one is for my buddy Charger. We just talked about Tyr, and how fantastic that album is, and how it was the Pinnacle of the Tony Martin era (most agreed with that, but not all). So, let's talk Mob Rules and how important that album is to the Dio era. I respect Dio, but I'm not the biggest fan of his music; however, Mob Rules is absolutely an exception. I was 15 or 16 years old when this album came out, and it has left a lasting impression on me. I remember being mesmerized by the cover back then, and also being knocked out by the mood of the album overall. There were a few key albums in everyone's record collection back then (speaking of new releases), and Mob Rules was one of them for me, and many of the folks I hung with.

    For me, Mob Rules is the one album where Dio struck a perfect balance between growling and singing, and it is great to hear his powerful voice on this album. He really did have a great voice when he decided to let it show through. Tony's guitar work on this album was really unique, with some wah wah effects, some droning solos, and some Hendrix type flourishes, but sadly, we never heard this tone again from him. Some of my favorite and most distinctive Iommi guitar work is on this album. Vinnie's drumming was so different from Bill's, but it was so completely complimentary to this venture. Every song on Mob Rules is a treasure for me, with the exception of "Slipping Away" which I really am not very fond of (I know Doc, I know ). Mob Rules, Sign of the Southern Cross, Turn up the Night, E5150, Country Girl and Falling off the Edge of the World are personal favorites.

    Anyway, in my opinion, Mob Rules is the peak of the Dio era and is as important to his legacy as Paranoid was to Ozzy and Tyr was to Martin. Mob Rules proudly resides within a small grouping of the best Friday night (no work tomorrow) albums of all time for me. One day I hope to acquire an original pressing Deluxe Edition CD for my collection, so, someone please tell us about it. Your thoughts please. Good, bad, or indifferent, let's hear it, and remember: "If you listen to fools, the Mob Rules!!!"

    A little treasure from my collection:

    Last edited by Now in Darkness; 12-03-2013, 10:42 PM.
    Casting his shadow, weaving his spell, funny clothes, tinkling bell.

  • #2
    Still not sabbath
    Vote leave if u want totally cool either way

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Spiralarchitectx1 View Post
      Still not sabbath
      True, but let's pretend.
      Casting his shadow, weaving his spell, funny clothes, tinkling bell.

      Comment


      • #4
        As long as Tony & Geezer are there its Sabbath. It's the one common denominator in all the truly great Sabbath albums.

        Mob Rules f'n rules! Agree with most of what you said NID except I love all the Dio era Sabbath albums along with his first 4 solo albums and everything he did with Rainbow & Elf.

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        • #5
          Mob Rules is probably my favorite Dio era Sabbath album, which would make it my 4th favorite Sabbath album overall. Sign of the Southern Cross and Country Girl have some of Iommi's best riff work. Over and Over is so emotional, especially the great soloing. Falling Off the Edge of the World is a grand epic, despite the short length, and has some of Dio's best vocal work; probably my favorite Dio era Sabbath song. I agree with NID that the only weak song is Slipping Away, though I think I now appreciate it more than I used to. At first I thought E5150 was boring, but I've since come to like the dark atmosphere it brings. Voodoo's got an infectious riff, and Turn Up the Night and the title track are quality too.
          Monty Python and the Holy Grail pic extravaganza! http://www.black-sabbath.com/vb/showthread.php?t=31523

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          • #6
            Love it.

            I cannot separate MR and Heaven and Hell as far as which is the favourite though.

            Comment


            • #7
              Two things: the opening crunch of Iommi's guitar on Turn Up The Night is one of the best sounds I have ever heard and it really lets you know you're in for a good time. The "Heavy Metal" version of the title track actually sounds better than the album version and I need to listen to it more.
              Upping The Irons and Defending The Faith

              Comment


              • #8
                Great subject Wizard... yes MR's is a classic for the ages, a great follow on to the other Dio Sab classic H&H... I thought both albums had a lot of "magic", with MR's being the darker one, but equally as great... and yes, Iommi on both the first 2 Dio Sab records was really on fire, never played better.... as much as I love Dio, I think he could be a bit petty and hard to get along with, which I think we saw throughout his career... maybe a bit of the lil' man syndrome, but he was a huge unique talent nontheless...

                H&H and MR's are like Paranoid and MOR, one long journey through metal Nirvana... hard to tell where one starts and one ends...
                "Music is so sacred to me that I canít hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                R. Blackmore

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think "Sign Of The Southern Cross" might be my favourite Black Sabbath song ever. (And yes, it's Black Sabbath, get the f**k over it...) As a kid, I heard the "Live Evil" version first and so to then discover a couple of years afterwards that this was only a small part of the song, wow... And when I was a kid, "Live Evil" itself sounded like it was recorded in some vast arena or stadium, the size of which my 16-year-old mind could barely comprehend. There's what sounds like a pyro explosion as RJD sings the very first line and it sounds tiny compared to the sound of the band and the room! (And while I'm upsetting people, I think the H&H LARCMH version is monstrous too).

                  Lyrically and in terms of imagery, it simultaneously conjures up to me the whole Southern Cross southern hemisphere thing, which to a northern European is very remote and exotic, but it also, for some unknown reason, conjures up images of somebody travelling alone in absolutely remote and black space, and when the riff kicks in, it just sounds, well, very dark and evil, as cliched as that might be...

                  Furthermore, I'm also a big fan of "Turn Up The Night"...
                  Follow mens' eyes, As they look to the skies, The shifting shafts of shining, Weave the fabric of their dreams...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
                    Great subject Wizard... yes MR's is a classic for the ages, a great follow on to the other Dio Sab classic H&H... I thought both albums had a lot of "magic", with MR's being the darker one, but equally as great... and yes, Iommi on both the first 2 Dio Sab records was really on fire, never played better.... as much as I love Dio, I think he could be a bit petty and hard to get along with, which I think we saw throughout his career... maybe a bit of the lil' man syndrome, but he was a huge unique talent nontheless...

                    H&H and MR's are like Paranoid and MOR, one long journey through metal Nirvana... hard to tell where one starts and one ends...
                    Couldn't have worded it better, WC. I salute you
                    "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
                    "Just take a look around you what do you see/Pain, suffering, and misery/It's not the way that the world was planned/It's a pity you don't understand" - Geezer Butler
                    "If god is in heaven/How can this happen here" - Phil Lynott (1949-1986)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by -E5150 StarWanderer- View Post
                      Couldn't have worded it better, WC. I salute you
                      Thank you Wanderer...
                      "Music is so sacred to me that I canít hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                      R. Blackmore

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Now in Darkness View Post
                        Okay, this one is for my buddy Charger.

                        Humble thank you... Hahaha!

                        Originally posted by Now in Darkness View Post
                        We just talked about Tyr, and how fantastic that album is, and how it was the Pinnacle of the Tony Martin era (most agreed with that, but not all). So, let's talk Mob Rules and how important that album is to the Dio era. I respect Dio, but I'm not the biggest fan of his music; however, Mob Rules is absolutely an exception. I was 15 or 16 years old when this album came out, and it has left a lasting impression on me. I remember being mesmerized by the cover back then, and also being knocked out by the mood of the album overall. There were a few key albums in everyone's record collection back then (speaking of new releases), and Mob Rules was one of them for me, and many of the folks I hung with.

                        For me, Mob Rules is the one album where Dio struck a perfect balance between growling and singing, and it is great to hear his powerful voice on this album. He really did have a great voice when he decided to let it show through. Tony's guitar work on this album was really unique, with some wah wah effects, some droning solos, and some Hendrix type flourishes, but sadly, we never heard this tone again from him. Some of my favorite and most distinctive Iommi guitar work is on this album. Vinnie's drumming was so different from Bill's, but it was so completely complimentary to this venture. Every song on Mob Rules is a treasure for me, with the exception of "Slipping Away" which I really am not very fond of (I know Doc, I know ). Mob Rules, Sign of the Southern Cross, Turn up the Night, E5150, Country Girl and Falling off the Edge of the World are personal favorites.

                        Anyway, in my opinion, Mob Rules is the peak of the Dio era and is as important to his legacy as Paranoid was to Ozzy and Tyr was to Martin. Mob Rules proudly resides within a small grouping of the best Friday night (no work tomorrow) albums of all time for me. One day I hope to acquire an original pressing Deluxe Edition CD for my collection, so, someone please tell us about it. Your thoughts please. Good, bad, or indifferent, let's hear it, and remember: "If you listen to fools, the Mob Rules!!!"
                        The Mob Rules might just be my favourite Sabbath album...The thing that has always plagued Sabbath is that there's always been atleast one or two real stinkers on every album...but this one has none...every single song is between great and SUBERB. I really like Slipping Away too eventhough it's not as heavy as the rest of the album...the Bass/guitar duel is absolutely amazing and actually the only time EVER that's been done on a Sabbath album. Sign Of The Southern Cross is without a doubt one of THE greatest songs ever written...that main riff...it gives me chills every single time! I also have on my phone's ringtone!

                        I totally agree that this might also have Ronnie's best vocal preformance (on a Sabbath album anyways) and it's quite clear that the entire band was firering with all cylinders at this point. Tony's playing is suberb, Geezer is truly fierce and Vinny really proved he's a world class drummer.

                        I think I wrote a 30th anniversary review of this back in 2011...I wonder if I can still find it...
                        EDIT:
                        Yes I could!
                        Happy 30th Birthday to THE MOB RULES!


                        Originally posted by Now in Darkness View Post
                        A little treasure from my collection:

                        I think I already commented on this one at the Collectors Corner but I'll say it again...That is one DAMN cool piece of history right there!
                        Yet another reason to be very envious of you mr. Wizard.
                        Last edited by Charger; 12-04-2013, 09:56 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Maybe Martin Birch can produce their next album! "14"
                          "Music is so sacred to me that I canít hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                          R. Blackmore

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
                            Maybe Martin Birch can produce their next album! "14"
                            I've been hoping for that exact scenario, but frankly, I didn't know whether he was alive or dead. I'd be thrilled if he produced the next one.
                            Casting his shadow, weaving his spell, funny clothes, tinkling bell.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Now in Darkness View Post
                              I've been hoping for that exact scenario, but frankly, I didn't know whether he was alive or dead. I'd be thrilled if he produced the next one.
                              From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

                              Birch began his career in music as an audio engineer with Jeff Beck, Fleetwood Mac and Deep Purple, producing and engineering eleven albums for the latter. In 1980, coming from the "Deep Purple camp",[1] he was called upon by Black Sabbath for Heaven and Hell; their previous albums had been self-produced and they were happy to let Birch, who had worked with Ronnie James Dio before, produce them.[2] His "bright midrange" on the album is especially noted.[3] In 1981 he began a long tenure working exclusively with Iron Maiden, producing and engineering Killers and retiring from working with other bands for a while.[3]

                              Birch has also produced and engineered albums for numerous artists, such as Deep Purple-related projects (Rainbow, Paice Ashton Lord, Whitesnake, Roger Glover, Jon Lord), but also Wayne County & the Electric Chairs. On Fleetwood Mac's album Mystery to Me (1973) he is also credited playing acoustic guitar.

                              The song "Hard Lovin' Man" from the Deep Purple album Deep Purple in Rock is dedicated to him : "For Martin Birch - catalyst".[2]

                              He retired in 1992, after producing Iron Maiden's Fear of the Dark album.
                              "Music is so sacred to me that I canít hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                              R. Blackmore

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