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Ozzy-Era Female Audience

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  • sterling#sound
    replied
    Originally posted by Jeff View Post
    One of the clichés I've seen develop about Black Sabbath through the years is that they are a "guy's band." Don't get me wrong, I think this is true to a fair extent. But find a picture from the front rows one of their US shows in the 70s and the females are not hard to find. Not to mention the numerous bootlegs out there with girls screaming their lungs out. I wonder if this perception sort of developed during the Dio-era? When the promo video came out for EotB I was surprised how many comments seemed to indicate that the audience should be a bunch of sweaty males. Have people who say stuff like this ever been to a Sabbath show with Ozzy?
    Never seen that pic before in the OP's post! Could you reveal the origin and when it was taken?

    Leave a comment:


  • OzzyIsDio
    replied
    Originally posted by princehollow View Post
    Exactly. This is why I try to distance myself from the metal crowd. Its all about the uniform. All these dudes trying to look the part but in effect they all look like sheep to me. I pretty much have to keep my love of metal secret these days because there is such a stigma that comes with it. Some people dismiss you because of it and others think that you are somehow some kind of crazy rock and roller and expect you to live up to it. And when around metal heads I never let on and only mention all the other kinds of music that I like. Some of these guys think you're only allowed to like metal. Boring.
    It's funny because my co-worker said to me, when I told him my band is Sabbath, he said you don't look like the Sabbath type, he said to me, "you are the most laid back person I've met"

    Maybe he thinks I'm suppose to have hair down to my ass, and covered in tattoos, walking around yelling and screaming or something, people are funny though in their stereo typing of people.

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  • princehollow
    replied
    Originally posted by Foul Stench View Post
    Now it's people in uniform, holding a beer and trying to act tough.
    Exactly. This is why I try to distance myself from the metal crowd. Its all about the uniform. All these dudes trying to look the part but in effect they all look like sheep to me. I pretty much have to keep my love of metal secret these days because there is such a stigma that comes with it. Some people dismiss you because of it and others think that you are somehow some kind of crazy rock and roller and expect you to live up to it. And when around metal heads I never let on and only mention all the other kinds of music that I like. Some of these guys think you're only allowed to like metal. Boring.

    Leave a comment:


  • frankzappa
    replied
    Originally posted by Jeff View Post
    It's a "tough guy" society to such a vast degree now. I'm sure this rears its head at concerts these days. I rarely attend concerts anymore, but I've no doubt this element exists all too often at "metal" shows.
    Most of the young females in the audience I saw at Sheffield were with their fathers. Stood next to me near the front row was another father with his disabled daughter, mingled amongst these were several people who were obviously under the influence and classical 'freak-like' Sabbath fans, but no hind of violence and it was a very hippified atmosphere, as far as possible in 2013. Black Sabbath fans tend to differ so much I don't think there is a stereotypical BS audience. Perhaps this was not the case in the moshpit at the centre, as I saw many things being thrown about several people stretchered out etc

    It would've helped if the security had allowed the audience to smoke weed, alcohol makes people violent and aggressive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff
    replied
    Originally posted by Foul Stench View Post
    Yes, it's historically and currently inaccurate. There are girls and I've seen a black girl who's into Sabbath and I doubt they're the only ones. Even Whoopi Goldberg is a fan ffs. But to slightly amend what I said before, by 'truckers' I pretty much meant the black clad, square jawed type (but there are also some Zack Wylde types). It's a far cry from the colourful hippie pic you posted. Before you had melody, and a whole variety of emotions and it was reflected in the clothes, the attitude. Now it's people in uniform, holding a beer and trying to act tough.
    It's a "tough guy" society to such a vast degree now. I'm sure this rears its head at concerts these days. I rarely attend concerts anymore, but I've no doubt this element exists all too often at "metal" shows.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff
    replied
    Originally posted by princehollow View Post
    Hey Jeff. I also agree that its a bit unfair that Sabbath are being labelled a 'guys band'. I think the problem with Sabbath is just that they were never as "cool" (read: pretentious) and as big headed as their contemporaries and that makes them more likeable to males. No matter how good of a performer Mick Jagger or Jimmy Page is I somehow don't think I would get along with them as real people. I'm not sexually attracted so what do I care? The guys in Sabbath on the other hand look like they could be my boys. Or AC/DC or Metallica. And once a fanboy always a fan boy. Females often seem to move on with their lives but guys become loyal for life. (I know there are females who are fans for life too, but realistically not as often... not even close. examples: Star Wars, football, etc) So the male fans that accumulate over the years often stay for life and keep growing but something tells me that its not quite the same with females. So it always looks like a majority of the fans are male.

    What bothers me about the press in the 70s is that they portrayed the Sabbath fan as young male stupid and aggressive. The press may have changed their opinion a bit but I'm sure there are lots of Sabbath fans who are hesitant to openly admit it in certain social circles. They are not fashionable. I blame this on those critics and maybe to a greater degree the greasy metal heads of the 80s, the "you better show me respect" frustrated Fred Durst's of the 90s, and whatever shithead followed in the next decade. So was it the fault of the 80s in all its macho glory? Maybe. In every pre-late 70s crowd photo I have ever seen of Sabbath there were always tons of girls.

    When I saw Sabbath in the summer, my only complaint is that there weren't enough young long hairs there. Every other demographic was there except the rockers! But I saw plenty of women young and old. More than Metallica a year before thats for certain. Metallica was all middle aged buzz cut black band tshirt guys. Not my crowd and I stood out like a sore thumb with long hair and tank top skinny jeans sneakers (pretty much like Hetfield in 1986).

    But don't worry Sabbath got plenty of tail back in the day and still do. And as for all this talk that they were "ugly" except Ozzy?! Are you kidding? This forum might be a sausage fest but you guys aren't reading what young girls are saying about Tony and Bill in other parts of the internet. Don't kid yourselves. These guys are worshipped like sex gods. They've been featured in teen girl magazines since 1970.
    Definitely some great points!

    And as to your latter comment, I know what you mean. One of the Facebook groups I belong to is a Tony Iommi one, and there are girls on there who drool over him every time a new picture is posted.

    But Sabbath were never "sex symbols" and I suppose that's part of why they had and still have so much credibility with their male audience. It's as you say; they seem like guys you could shoot the breeze with about music and not have them waving their hair back and looking out of the other eye for any girls who might know who they are.

    Leave a comment:


  • princehollow
    replied
    Hey NID I was up in the balcony



    Leave a comment:


  • princehollow
    replied
    Hey Jeff. I also agree that its a bit unfair that Sabbath are being labelled a 'guys band'. I think the problem with Sabbath is just that they were never as "cool" (read: pretentious) and as big headed as their contemporaries and that makes them more likeable to males. No matter how good of a performer Mick Jagger or Jimmy Page is I somehow don't think I would get along with them as real people. I'm not sexually attracted so what do I care? The guys in Sabbath on the other hand look like they could be my boys. Or AC/DC or Metallica. And once a fanboy always a fan boy. Females often seem to move on with their lives but guys become loyal for life. (I know there are females who are fans for life too, but realistically not as often... not even close. examples: Star Wars, football, etc) So the male fans that accumulate over the years often stay for life and keep growing but something tells me that its not quite the same with females. So it always looks like a majority of the fans are male.

    What bothers me about the press in the 70s is that they portrayed the Sabbath fan as young male stupid and aggressive. The press may have changed their opinion a bit but I'm sure there are lots of Sabbath fans who are hesitant to openly admit it in certain social circles. They are not fashionable. I blame this on those critics and maybe to a greater degree the greasy metal heads of the 80s, the "you better show me respect" frustrated Fred Durst's of the 90s, and whatever shithead followed in the next decade. So was it the fault of the 80s in all its macho glory? Maybe. In every pre-late 70s crowd photo I have ever seen of Sabbath there were always tons of girls.

    When I saw Sabbath in the summer, my only complaint is that there weren't enough young long hairs there. Every other demographic was there except the rockers! But I saw plenty of women young and old. More than Metallica a year before thats for certain. Metallica was all middle aged buzz cut black band tshirt guys. Not my crowd and I stood out like a sore thumb with long hair and tank top skinny jeans sneakers (pretty much like Hetfield in 1986).

    But don't worry Sabbath got plenty of tail back in the day and still do. And as for all this talk that they were "ugly" except Ozzy?! Are you kidding? This forum might be a sausage fest but you guys aren't reading what young girls are saying about Tony and Bill in other parts of the internet. Don't kid yourselves. These guys are worshipped like sex gods. They've been featured in teen girl magazines since 1970.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spiralarchitectx1
    replied
    Conclusion.... Sabbath is liked by some females(mainly wife's and daughters) cool! Will this increase our changes of getting laid?
    HELL NO!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff
    replied
    Originally posted by Foul Stench View Post
    Jeff, that's a whole different era and the same applied for everyone. People of different genres mixed together a lot more. I don't know if you can judge Sabbath today by the times then.
    Eh, I'm not so sure it's as simple as it being a different era. But I do agree that is a part of it. Probably a big part of it.

    So ... let's use that as a basis for discussion.

    Sabbath came to prominence in the 1970s.

    Hence, the idea that they were a band who was as Henry Rollins describes in the Making Of Paranoid DVD really doesn't tell the whole story. I think Rollins describes how it was when I was growing up, but that was the 1980s.

    Put it this way: If the Sabbath movie is ever made and they get it historically accurate, there will be females in the audience during the concert scenes. Especially at any shows that depict scenes of concerts in the US. And I bet you anything the idiots will come out and say that wasn't really like a Sabbath show and doesn't depict how it was. But those people are talking out of their asses.

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  • Spiralarchitectx1
    replied
    Originally posted by Wheels Of Confusion View Post
    That's raising them the right way man
    Ha ha , possibly.

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  • Wheels Of Confusion
    replied
    That's raising them the right way man

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  • Spiralarchitectx1
    replied
    Well I could never answer that what sabbath you first bought thread cause I was brought up surrounded by sabbath so never had to buy any albums really.
    It's in my blood, and it's gonna get passed down to my kid too!

    Leave a comment:


  • Now in Darkness
    replied
    Here's the audience from the last Sabbath show I saw. The place was crawling with chicks, kids, and old people. This crowd was no different than with any other rock band I have seen, except for Journey, and that was just disgusting. Taken from my seat.



    Last edited by Now in Darkness; 01-18-2014, 10:30 PM.

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  • Jeff
    replied
    My point is just that a lot of people who write about Sabbath don't really know about Sabbath.

    Plenty of pretty good shots of the audience at Santa Monica, 1975. See a predominantly "leather and chains" crowd?


    Leave a comment:

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