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Ozzy-Era Female Audience

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  • Originally posted by Billy Underdog View Post

    The problem with Pantera was, along with Phil Anselmo talking out of his ass pretty often, they were also very proud of being southerners/Texans, even using the confederate flag. For them it was about their culture and heritage, not at all having a racist point of view, but that along with having some pretty violent and "take no bullshit" lyrics did attract some unwanted elements. It ended with Dimebag being shot on stage, so just goes to show what a thin line one is walking when using such imagery and topics.
    Yes that probably added to the problem, I even seen them walking around screaming White Power, and literally knocking people out of the way.

    That was most unfortunate what happened to Dimebag Darrell.
    "Without Black Sabbath there never would have been an Ozzy, and without Ozzy there never would have been a Black Sabbath"
    "If there ever was a band whose voice is so significant and distinct, that band is Black Sabbath and the voice is Ozzy Osbourne"
    ________________________________________OzzyIsDio_ (YoY)

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    • I was at The University of Texas at Austin when not only was there a hair metal band named Pantera, there was also a Pantera's Pizza that had some pretty mean slices, right up there with Milto's and Conan's. This was 1986-1989.

      Pantera's Pizza had been pretty well established, so we were all "WTF? A hair metal band named after a pizza store? Guess it takes all types to make the world go 'round..." Maybe the pizza store connection was just a coincidence, but it's what we thought.

      Years later, when Pantera started showing up on MTV and Diamond Darrell was now Dimebag Darrell and Rexx Rocker was just Rex Brown, I was kinda floored that they had gone so completely from glam to grunt. But based on that genre shift alone, I'd wager that their female fanbase *declined* from the 80s to the 90s.

      As a teacher in the 2000s to about 2013, I never heard a girl chanting out the lyrics to "Walk" by Pantera. Guys would chant it periodically. I'll add that anecdotal evidence to support my view that Pantera found a way to turn away the ladies in the early 90s.

      On the flipside, "Don't Stop Believin'" by Journey is guaranteed to have a predominantly female sing-along chorus. Even more so for "Open Arms". While Journey's first three releases with Gregg Rolie on vocals aren't particularly polarizing as regards gender, bringing in Steve Perry meant ballads and with those ballads, the ladies began to flock.

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      • Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
        I was at The University of Texas at Austin when not only was there a hair metal band named Pantera, there was also a Pantera's Pizza that had some pretty mean slices, right up there with Milto's and Conan's. This was 1986-1989.

        Pantera's Pizza had been pretty well established, so we were all "WTF? A hair metal band named after a pizza store? Guess it takes all types to make the world go 'round..." Maybe the pizza store connection was just a coincidence, but it's what we thought.

        Years later, when Pantera started showing up on MTV and Diamond Darrell was now Dimebag Darrell and Rexx Rocker was just Rex Brown, I was kinda floored that they had gone so completely from glam to grunt. But based on that genre shift alone, I'd wager that their female fanbase *declined* from the 80s to the 90s.

        As a teacher in the 2000s to about 2013, I never heard a girl chanting out the lyrics to "Walk" by Pantera. Guys would chant it periodically. I'll add that anecdotal evidence to support my view that Pantera found a way to turn away the ladies in the early 90s.

        On the flipside, "Don't Stop Believin'" by Journey is guaranteed to have a predominantly female sing-along chorus. Even more so for "Open Arms". While Journey's first three releases with Gregg Rolie on vocals aren't particularly polarizing as regards gender, bringing in Steve Perry meant ballads and with those ballads, the ladies began to flock.
        They took the name from this car that Vinnie was a huge fan of:



        Funny connection with the pizza place, though. And cool that you were around in their earliest days.

        The name Rexx Rocker always cracks me up, the least Glam guy of the lot, atleast until Anselmo came along.
        95% of everything i say is pure bullshit just for the fun of it. The other 95% is damn serious!
        Til įrs ok frišar ok forn sišr

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        • I have an intuition that having extensive collections, be it of comic books, guns, motorcycles, bootlegs, vinyl, etc., is a predominantly male activity. Women do have large collections of shoes though. Yes, these are stereotypes, I realize that, thus my appeal to "intuition". I do wonder if that may be one of the main factors that lead to overall less hard core female "fans" when it comes to both progressive, or album rock and obscure, underground bands, while female fans tend to gravitate toward the more ephemeral musics that make it on the radio, more a "music of utility" if you will, rather than a "music of identity". I do apologize for making such a suggestion, but the thought occured to me and it seemed brilliant in a myopic way, haha

          https://diamonddavewonfor.wordpress....cting-organ-2/

          Please note, I'm not making a value judgement. Utility in fact seems much more useful than identity. Fandom seems kind of silly to me...
          Last edited by Sicko FanAtic; 02-10-2018, 10:36 AM.
          You bought and sold me with your lying words.
          Phil, your head's all full of lice!

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          • ^^^ Stereotypes are fun, because they're both true and false at the same time...
            95% of everything i say is pure bullshit just for the fun of it. The other 95% is damn serious!
            Til įrs ok frišar ok forn sišr

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            • Originally posted by Sicko FanAtic View Post
              I have an intuition that having extensive collections, be it of comic books, guns, motorcycles, bootlegs, vinyl, etc., is a predominantly male activity. Women do have large collections of shoes though. Yes, these are stereotypes, I realize that, thus my appeal to "intuition". I do wonder if that may be one of the main factors that lead to overall less hard core female "fans" when it comes to both progressive, or album rock and obscure, underground bands, while female fans tend to gravitate toward the more ephemeral musics that make it on the radio, more a "music of utility" if you will, rather than a "music of identity". I do apologize for making such a suggestion, but the thought occured to me and it seemed brilliant in a myopic way, haha

              https://diamonddavewonfor.wordpress....cting-organ-2/

              Please note, I'm not making a value judgement. Utility in fact seems much more useful than identity. Fandom seems kind of silly to me...
              I share your intuition, Sicko, and you are making some very interesting points here in my opinion. I like it how you name tendencies without insinuating that something must be wrong with every woman or man who doesn't correspond to those tendencies (e.g. me, with my very nerdy habits in collecting unofficial Sabbath recordings, many of which are pretty much unlisteneable ;-) ). Also, by distinguishing "music of utility" from "music of identity", you leave the level of mere description and enter into real analysis. Spontaneously it feels right to me that many women have a somehow more pragmatic relationship to music than many men. On the other hand, during adolescence, many girls do seem to have an "identity" connection to music too - some with boy groups, some with punk, goth, metal... but for many, this seems to change when they grow up... hm... interesting...

              I also agree with your critical stance regarding fandom.

              Again, thanks for your thoughts. You are demonstrating that it is absolutely possible to talk about possible differences between groups of people without devaluing one of them. Good job IMO.

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              • Glad we can find a point of agreement, Linda. Being exposed to academia has led me to A: say things in a way that leaves nobody offended, leading to B. Saying effectively nothing at all, haha
                You bought and sold me with your lying words.
                Phil, your head's all full of lice!

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                • Originally posted by Sicko FanAtic View Post
                  Glad we can find a point of agreement, Linda. Being exposed to academia has led me to A: say things in a way that leaves nobody offended, leading to B. Saying effectively nothing at all, haha
                  LOL, same here.

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                  • Originally posted by Sicko FanAtic View Post
                    Being exposed to academia has led me to A: say things in a way that leaves nobody offended, leading to B. Saying effectively nothing at all, haha

                    .........
                    Do what thou will shall be the whole of the law

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                    • The very interesting point of view of Tom G. Warrior from Triptykon about female audience in Metal music through last decades .
                      No hostile or angry fellings guaranteed , just common sense.

                      http://fischerisdead.blogspot.fr/201...ew-part-1.html

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                      • Originally posted by Sin Cardinal Sin
                        *************deleted*******
                        The fire has been extinguished but here comes Sin with gasoline and a match. Very sexist.
                        Last edited by Damian; 02-20-2018, 06:47 PM.

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                        • Originally posted by turch118 View Post
                          The fire has been extinguished but here comes Sin with gasoline and a match. Very sexist.
                          Absolutely right, Turch. Another fire going out.
                          Damian
                          Super Moderator
                          Black-Sabbath.com

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                          • Thank you Damian.

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                            • Originally posted by TYR66 View Post
                              The very interesting point of view of Tom G. Warrior from Triptykon about female audience in Metal music through last decades .
                              No hostile or angry fellings guaranteed , just common sense.

                              http://fischerisdead.blogspot.fr/201...ew-part-1.html
                              It seems that woman hear differently from men.
                              Therefore they are attracted to a less aggressive sound.


                              Originally posted by Sicko FanAtic View Post
                              One idea running through this thread is that we all agree, Sabbath is mostly a "guy's band". What makes it that way? This question has, of course, received a good deal of attention in academic studies ( not concerning Sabbath in particular). Here's a link that summarizes a good deal of that research

                              https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyc...sic_preference
                              Originally posted by BACK TO EDEN View Post
                              Also very true in audio ,, females tend to lean toward "2 way" speakers (less bass) , and males tend to lean toward "3 way" speakers and beyond , at a rate of about 20 to 1 .... size plays a big role here , along with "soundwave" production.

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                              • Originally posted by Billy Underdog View Post
                                ^^^ Stereotypes are fun, because they're both true and false at the same time...
                                Well Billy your right! (and wrong)! at the same time!
                                "Music is so sacred to me that I can’t hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                                R. Blackmore

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