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Ozzy-Era Female Audience

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  • Billy Underdog
    replied
    Originally posted by Sabbabbath View Post

    How about Slayer? Venom?
    Both pretty "dudeish", but i don't see any reason for girls not liking any of them. Not as much in the early 80's maybe, both being all rough & though, Venom even somewhat "knuckledraggers" (yes, i'm a fan), but both the bands and the times have changed.
    Should've been more girls around who could answer that...

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  • Sicko FanAtic
    replied
    One idea running through this thread is that we all agree, Sabbath is mostly a "guy's band". What makes it that way? This question has, of course, received a good deal of attention in academic studies ( not concerning Sabbath in particular). Here's a link that summarizes a good deal of that research

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyc...sic_preference

    Leave a comment:


  • Sabbabbath
    replied
    I see. Yeah, I didn't know Pantera were softer in te 1980ies than in the 1990ies. Never liked them very much. In the 1990ies at my school, all Pantera fans were boys. I was the only Sabbath fan at the whole school, AFAIK.

    How about Slayer? Venom?

    Leave a comment:


  • Billy Underdog
    replied
    Originally posted by Sabbabbath View Post
    How about black metal bands like Mayhem, Darkthrone, Gorgoroth or Emperor, especially during their earlier years?
    BM bands (atleast the "second wave" or "first Norwegian wave" had a huge female following. It's about atmosphere and emotions, you know, as well as getting lost in the soothing cacophony of noice.

    Originally posted by Sabbabbath View Post
    I guess that Pantera had probably much more female fans in the 1990ies than in the 1980ies, or am I wrong?
    Well, being a Glam Metal band playing pubs in the 80's i'd imagine they had some female fans. As far as you can talk about any Pantera fans at all in the 80's...

    Leave a comment:


  • OzzyIsDio
    replied
    Originally posted by William_the_Bloody View Post
    It's unclear if they had *any* fans in the 80's. Having been a card-carrying member of metal in the 80's in Detroit, I am almost 100% certain nobody had heard of them, here.

    But sure, once they were on the radio (really, the first band that was "Hard" getting airplay, certainly much more than Black Sabbath even at that time) they managed to accumulate many female fans that were reaching for that "Half Metalhead/Half Thug" vibe that Pantera had going.

    This was the time when women really started piercing everything and all tatted up and Hardcore and Pantera went right along with that.

    But Black Sabbath was something their Uncle liked. Speaking generally, of course, as I am known to do.
    The few times I saw Pantera they had lots of skinheads present, sieg heiling and all, I always found that odd at Pantera concerts.
    Last edited by OzzyIsDio; 02-09-2018, 03:49 PM.

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  • William_the_Bloody
    replied
    Originally posted by Sabbabbath View Post
    I guess that Pantera had probably much more female fans in the 1990ies than in the 1980ies, or am I wrong?
    It's unclear if they had *any* fans in the 80's. Having been a card-carrying member of metal in the 80's in Detroit, I am almost 100% certain nobody had heard of them, here.

    But sure, once they were on the radio (really, the first band that was "Hard" getting airplay, certainly much more than Black Sabbath even at that time) they managed to accumulate many female fans that were reaching for that "Half Metalhead/Half Thug" vibe that Pantera had going.

    This was the time when women really started piercing everything and all tatted up and Hardcore and Pantera went right along with that.

    But Black Sabbath was something their Uncle liked. Speaking generally, of course, as I am known to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sabbabbath
    replied
    I guess that Pantera had probably much more female fans in the 1990ies than in the 1980ies, or am I wrong?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sabbabbath
    replied
    Not sure. Maybe Metallica in 1984? Cannibal Corpse? How about black metal bands like Mayhem, Darkthrone, Gorgoroth or Emperor, especially during their earlier years?
    I don't have any first-hand experience there, I am just imagining those would probably have a 95%+ male audience... But I might be wrong of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Billy Underdog
    replied
    I would guess Mentors had mostly a male fan-base...

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  • Jeff
    replied
    Originally posted by William_the_Bloody View Post
    Has anyone asked this question, outright?

    Is there such a thing as a "Guy's Band" at all? You cite Pantera, above, but in all honesty I've personally encountered far more females closer to a "Pantera Fan" than a "Black Sabbath Fan" (As loosely defined by my personal standards.)
    I don't know enough about Pantera to know if that was a poor example. Probably should have used another one.

    I'm not sure I've ever met a female Pantera fan, while I've known numerous female Sabs fans, but I wasn't meaning to use my own experience as any kind of indicator. I just assumed (perhaps wrongly?) that they might be an example of a band far more exclusive to males than Ozzy-era Sabbath.

    I feel like much of what I say in thread has a point that gets lost in translation with some folks. Probably need to explain what I mean better, I don't know ...

    Leave a comment:


  • zzzptm
    replied
    Originally posted by William_the_Bloody View Post
    Has anyone asked this question, outright?

    Is there such a thing as a "Guy's Band" at all? You cite Pantera, above, but in all honesty I've personally encountered far more females closer to a "Pantera Fan" than a "Black Sabbath Fan" (As loosely defined by my personal standards.)
    I'd guess that there are probably a good number of gangsta rap acts that have a 95%+ male fanbase.

    Leave a comment:


  • William_the_Bloody
    replied
    Has anyone asked this question, outright?

    Is there such a thing as a "Guy's Band" at all? You cite Pantera, above, but in all honesty I've personally encountered far more females closer to a "Pantera Fan" than a "Black Sabbath Fan" (As loosely defined by my personal standards.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff
    replied
    Originally posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    Jeff you base your argument on live concerts, people go to concerts for various reasons many times just for the party with friends not because they die hard fans of the band. Like EVERY band Sabbath grew tired of the groupies is that a surprise?
    I'm not sure you understand my "argument," homes.

    My point was only ever that Sabbath were never a "guy's band" IN THE WAY that some lazy music "historians" might perceive. I think we can probably all agree that we needn't define all bands as either one or the other (guy band/chick band). Certainly there is some ground between Peter Frampton and say ... Pantera. Sabbath might be a bit closer to the Pantera side if one considers their entire career, but there is a lot of room there.

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  • Wicked Cricket
    replied
    Originally posted by Sabbabbath View Post
    I personally don't know any woman who goes to rock or metal concerts without being into the band that plays. Of course, my circle of acquaintances is surely not representative, plus things might have been different in the 1970ies. On the other hand, do you believe that 1970ies Sabbath concerts were attended by many people just for having a party with friends or similar reasons? And if so, is there any reason to assume that would have applied to all women present?

    Again, nobody here has ever claimed that there was a huge amount of women among 1970ies Sabbath fans. What I find interesting is that even the idea that there might have SOME real female Sabbath fans in the 1970ies seems to be make some people's heads explode. :-) Is that really so unthinkable? In my view, Sabbath's music is pretty diverse in terms of feel, musical styles and elements, subject matters etc. War Pigs and COTG deal with war - were there no women in the anti-war movements? Some of their songs are about drugs, others about religion. Are women not interested in drugs or religion? Several songs deal with isolation or violence. Does anyone here believe that women don't experience isolation or violence? And so on.
    of course there were some women at their concerts..women as a whole aren't into bands who's message was of the content of Sabbath's, they aren't wired that way. At least in the 70's not so much.

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  • Sabbabbath
    replied
    Originally posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    Jeff you base your argument on live concerts, people go to concerts for various reasons many times just for the party with friends not because they die hard fans of the band.
    I personally don't know any woman who goes to rock or metal concerts without being into the band that plays. Of course, my circle of acquaintances is surely not representative, plus things might have been different in the 1970ies. On the other hand, do you believe that 1970ies Sabbath concerts were attended by many people just for having a party with friends or similar reasons? And if so, is there any reason to assume that would have applied to all women present?

    Again, nobody here has ever claimed that there was a huge amount of women among 1970ies Sabbath fans. What I find interesting is that even the idea that there might have SOME real female Sabbath fans in the 1970ies seems to be make some people's heads explode. :-) Is that really so unthinkable? In my view, Sabbath's music is pretty diverse in terms of feel, musical styles and elements, subject matters etc. War Pigs and COTG deal with war - were there no women in the anti-war movements? Some of their songs are about drugs, others about religion. Are women not interested in drugs or religion? Several songs deal with isolation or violence. Does anyone here believe that women don't experience isolation or violence? And so on.

    Leave a comment:

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