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Serican-cyberpunk-drone-doom-sludge-metal AKA modern metal in 2016

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  • Serican-cyberpunk-drone-doom-sludge-metal AKA modern metal in 2016



    For quite a while I was looking for good Chinese metal from all under heaven, but I was disappionted. How come it's so hard to find one that actually sounds like timetravelling to ancient China?
    So, I ended up making one myself. Enjoy :D
    Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
    Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
    In the age of reason, how do we survive?
    The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

  • #2


    Another than several heavy tracks, this one is more ambient-like, with echoes and reverbs.


    PS. the latin names right next to the Chinese title are from Baxter-Sagart reconstruction of old Chinese pronunciations.
    Last edited by LouiST; 12-18-2016, 09:41 PM.
    Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
    Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
    In the age of reason, how do we survive?
    The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

    Comment


    • #3
      Very interesting project! One of my favorite instruments is the guqin. Hearing what you made here made me wonder how something like this:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkY9z21BDP4

      would translate into an electric performance. Volume control would be important, as would knowing when to let vibrate and when to cut the note short. Getting those slides right would also be part of the trick. I hear those things especially in the second post you made, but I think classical Chinese music is a little like funk: what you don't play is more important than what you do play. Longer pauses between some notes, make your solo more contemplative?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
        Very interesting project! One of my favorite instruments is the guqin. Hearing what you made here made me wonder how something like this:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkY9z21BDP4

        would translate into an electric performance. Volume control would be important, as would knowing when to let vibrate and when to cut the note short. Getting those slides right would also be part of the trick. I hear those things especially in the second post you made, but I think classical Chinese music is a little like funk: what you don't play is more important than what you do play. Longer pauses between some notes, make your solo more contemplative?
        Ancient guqin strings were made of silk, so it sounded not as loud as modern guqin with steel strings. An amplified guitar is even louder, but you can also hear all kinds of noises even if you are not pressing the strings. What probably does matter is where the sound should go under different circumstances. I'm still trying, and I kind of feel like exploring a territory I've never been before. I could be wrong though, maybe someone had done the same thing before me, maybe better than me. Nonetheless, I also feel like going through it more and more would someday lead me to something really amazing. I sense there's so much more hidden in the power of music.
        Last edited by LouiST; 12-20-2016, 02:04 AM.
        Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
        Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
        In the age of reason, how do we survive?
        The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

        Comment


        • #5
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUUkw9tVGOI << This guy has the sound, electrified. I tried a more professional looking video when I searched for "electric guqin" and got a prog-jazz-space-lounge group that seemed to be using the guqin to make sounds with a modern composition, not satisfying at all... but this guy really took me back to the wooded banks by the old Huang He...

          Looks like if you have a guitar you can re-string and tear apart, you can make your own guqin!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUUkw9tVGOI << This guy has the sound, electrified. I tried a more professional looking video when I searched for "electric guqin" and got a prog-jazz-space-lounge group that seemed to be using the guqin to make sounds with a modern composition, not satisfying at all... but this guy really took me back to the wooded banks by the old Huang He...

            Looks like if you have a guitar you can re-string and tear apart, you can make your own guqin!
            Fretless guitar does sound closer, but it would be too challenging for me to get the right note lol. Back when I play violin, I always struggled on that.
            Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
            Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
            In the age of reason, how do we survive?
            The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by LouiST View Post
              Fretless guitar does sound closer, but it would be too challenging for me to get the right note lol. Back when I play violin, I always struggled on that.
              That's why I had little tape strips across the neck of my cello... and then still kept an eye on the adhesive residue after the tape wore off.

              Back to the hunt for that AZN sound... long, sustained notes are a thing, as are rapid, "horse gallop" rhythms. Altan Urag are a band from Mongolia that do some really fantastic things.



              OK, so the vocal may not be everyone's cup of tea... Mercyful Fate fans are looking at me now, asking with their eyes and expression, "You like THAT, but King Diamond's too screechy for you? Ohhhh kaaaaaayyyyy..." But I like what I like. My point being, if you've got a guy doing that rapid pick while another guy is playing sustained notes, all in a Chinese/Mongol tuning, that might be the secret sauce you're looking for.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
                That's why I had little tape strips across the neck of my cello... and then still kept an eye on the adhesive residue after the tape wore off.

                Back to the hunt for that AZN sound... long, sustained notes are a thing, as are rapid, "horse gallop" rhythms. Altan Urag are a band from Mongolia that do some really fantastic things.


                OK, so the vocal may not be everyone's cup of tea... Mercyful Fate fans are looking at me now, asking with their eyes and expression, "You like THAT, but King Diamond's too screechy for you? Ohhhh kaaaaaayyyyy..." But I like what I like. My point being, if you've got a guy doing that rapid pick while another guy is playing sustained notes, all in a Chinese/Mongol tuning, that might be the secret sauce you're looking for.
                Is this soundtrack for Alien lol?
                This one sounds great, and obviously nomadic. I think I should try multitracking as well.

                If you look for older Cantonese pop though (around 60s-early 70s), it would sound like old opera fusing with surf rock.
                This song is about a early Han dynasty girl marrying a ruler of Xiongnu(might be pronunced like qhong-na back then). The compilation cover looks like the first Sabbath album lol.
                Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
                Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
                In the age of reason, how do we survive?
                The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah, it's the same house and lady, but in the daylight and from a different angle.

                  This older Cantopop sounds similar to Thai / Khmer pop - Cantopop's changed a lot since those days, lots more slicker, kind of like what happened to country music. That "surf" sound is from the rapid strumming, which technique Dick Dale brought to surf from his Lebanese heritage.

                  Back to the Mongol music, that band did do the soundtrack for "Mongol", a biopic of the early years of Genghis Khan, when he was known as Temuujin. And the "horse gallop" becomes a rapid strumming when that style reaches other cultures the Mongols touched, which includes both the Chinese and the Arabic. But it's still also the style in Central Asia. Here's a Yakut performer doing it with a mouth harp:



                  Yes, there's a techno beat backing her up, but all the animal sounds are her voice and the mouth harp itself has a percussive ring to it that makes the techno track a little redundant. I watched one group of Yakut performers do numbers both with and without a techno backing track, and all the track added was some texture that could have been handled by 2 or 3 other performers joining in the jam.

                  Traditional Chinese it ain't, but it is an influence on Chinese music for sure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
                    Yeah, it's the same house and lady, but in the daylight and from a different angle.

                    This older Cantopop sounds similar to Thai / Khmer pop - Cantopop's changed a lot since those days, lots more slicker, kind of like what happened to country music. That "surf" sound is from the rapid strumming, which technique Dick Dale brought to surf from his Lebanese heritage.

                    Back to the Mongol music, that band did do the soundtrack for "Mongol", a biopic of the early years of Genghis Khan, when he was known as Temuujin. And the "horse gallop" becomes a rapid strumming when that style reaches other cultures the Mongols touched, which includes both the Chinese and the Arabic. But it's still also the style in Central Asia. Here's a Yakut performer doing it with a mouth harp:



                    Yes, there's a techno beat backing her up, but all the animal sounds are her voice and the mouth harp itself has a percussive ring to it that makes the techno track a little redundant. I watched one group of Yakut performers do numbers both with and without a techno backing track, and all the track added was some texture that could have been handled by 2 or 3 other performers joining in the jam.

                    Traditional Chinese it ain't, but it is an influence on Chinese music for sure.
                    This is wild! Techno but wild. Didn't know the band composed the music for Mongol though. It's a powerful film.
                    Chinese and the nomads did historically influence each other a lot. Erhu is known to be Chinese, but it was originally a nomadic instrument, hence the the name "string instrument of the Hu(Ga in Old Chinese) peoples".
                    Old Cantopop was still heavily influenced by Cantonese opera, but then came the hits from Europe and America, and the rock and roll influence. Nowadays music in Hongkong is very diversed, but most of the groups still remain underground.
                    Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
                    Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
                    In the age of reason, how do we survive?
                    The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So, it's Cantonese opera style that I hear in SE Asian music? That's cool to learn. I really like the modal changes and it's nowhere near as harsh as Beijing opera.

                      True about Euro/US influences... when I go looking for Chinese metal, most of what I find is stuff that is 100% Western with Mandarin lyrics, the rest will have an intro played on a traditional instrument, then into the metal. Then there are the bands that use traditional instruments, but to produce Western music, not the stuff they were originally tuned for. It's what sells, I guess.

                      That being said, Tang Dynasty's first album totally rocks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
                        So, it's Cantonese opera style that I hear in SE Asian music? That's cool to learn. I really like the modal changes and it's nowhere near as harsh as Beijing opera.

                        True about Euro/US influences... when I go looking for Chinese metal, most of what I find is stuff that is 100% Western with Mandarin lyrics, the rest will have an intro played on a traditional instrument, then into the metal. Then there are the bands that use traditional instruments, but to produce Western music, not the stuff they were originally tuned for. It's what sells, I guess.

                        That being said, Tang Dynasty's first album totally rocks.
                        If it's Southeas Asian, then it could be Vietnamese, after all they used to share the same writing system with us.
                        There's at least one Chinese metal band in Hongkong singing in Cantonese. One is Evocation招魂, their newest album Abracadabra/天靈靈地靈靈 is brutal, not in Chinese scales, but they are heavily influenced by Taoism. One of the member survived cancer I think.
                        Do you hear the thunder raging in the sky?
                        Premonition of a shattered world thatís gonna die.
                        In the age of reason, how do we survive?
                        The protocols of evil ravaging so many lives?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LouiST
                          ... multiple posts ...
                          This is an interesting thread, I've really enjoyed experiencing the sounds you and the Magnificent Mister Deep Purple posted. And the instrument/cultural stylings discussion is schooling me. Fantastic!
                          gadji beri bimba glandridi laula lonni cadori - Ball

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zzzptm View Post
                            Yeah, it's the same house and lady, but in the daylight and from a different angle.

                            This older Cantopop sounds similar to Thai / Khmer pop - Cantopop's changed a lot since those days, lots more slicker, kind of like what happened to country music. That "surf" sound is from the rapid strumming, which technique Dick Dale brought to surf from his Lebanese heritage.

                            Back to the Mongol music, that band did do the soundtrack for "Mongol", a biopic of the early years of Genghis Khan, when he was known as Temuujin. And the "horse gallop" becomes a rapid strumming when that style reaches other cultures the Mongols touched, which includes both the Chinese and the Arabic. But it's still also the style in Central Asia. Here's a Yakut performer doing it with a mouth harp:



                            Yes, there's a techno beat backing her up, but all the animal sounds are her voice and the mouth harp itself has a percussive ring to it that makes the techno track a little redundant. I watched one group of Yakut performers do numbers both with and without a techno backing track, and all the track added was some texture that could have been handled by 2 or 3 other performers joining in the jam.

                            Traditional Chinese it ain't, but it is an influence on Chinese music for sure.

                            Is she a Viking and that Viking music?
                            "Without Black Sabbath there never would have been an Ozzy, and without Ozzy there never would have been a Black Sabbath"
                            "If there ever was a band whose voice is so significant and distinct, that band is Black Sabbath and the voice is Ozzy Osbourne"
                            ________________________________________OzzyIsDio_ (YoY)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OzzyIsDio View Post
                              Is she a Viking and that Viking music?
                              She's from Yakutia, which is north of Mongolia in Siberia. While there was a lot of trade above the Arctic Circle, I don't think culture diffused as much with that trade, historically. Chances of Vikings making music like that I would think to be rather slim.

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