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Led Zeppelin II - 40th Anniversary

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  • Led Zeppelin II - 40th Anniversary

    It was released on the 22nd October 1969.

    There's a short documentary with contributions from Page & Plant here: http://www.inthestudio.net/
    >>TECHNICINS F SPCE
    SHIP ERTH THIS IS
    YR CPTIN SPEKING
    YR PTIN IS DEA˝D<<

  • #2
    Good on ya Ady, for bringing this up---and I've been involved in trading talk on Zep in the forums, lately.

    LZ II remains my top fave Zeppelin record. From the opening strains of Whole Lotta Love (which despite singular over-exposure on radio..etc, I still love a whole lot ) to the closing notes of Bring It On Home, I'm amazed how I seem to still love this classic record, right through, in almost the same ways I always have, for the past nearly 20 years. Ady, it's true how the Zeppelin records have 'aged' marvellously, in my eyes. I'm betting that twenty years down the line, I'd be celebrating the '40th' anniversary of my own fortunate acquaintance and lasting love affair with Led Zeppelin.

    edit: I have already seen that brief documentary a while back. Good stuff, and should be happy viewing for the rest of the fans, around here.
    Last edited by RLP4ever; 10-21-2009, 09:23 PM.
    "Actors really are the scum of the earth. Their behavior makes arrogant, overpaid rock stars appear positively noble' - Buzz Osborne

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    • #3
      I agree 100% with ya RLP, ZEP II is their shining moment. It is by far, start to finish, their best work. This is not to diminish or take away any of the other albums. IMO, LZII is the best Zeppelin album.

      Every song sounds as good to day as it did the first time I heard, back in the 70's at the tender age of 5.

      Thanks for posting about this Ady!!
      "I can honestly say its truly been an honor to play at his side for all these years, his music will live on forever." ~ Tony Iommi (Speaking of Ronnie James Dio)

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      • #4
        The Brown Bomber...I was three years old when it came out!

        I agree that it's overexposed, but I think it is Zep's keynote album in terms of sheer thudding heaviness. One of my old teenage bands used to do a (very shitty) cover of "Living Loving Maid," and "Heartbreaker" was one of the first riffs I learnt (along with the eternal "Smoke On The Water" and "(Don't Fear) The Reaper").
        He is not here. He has risen!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DiosSword View Post
          I agree that it's overexposed, but I think it is Zep's keynote album in terms of sheer thudding heaviness.
          I'll go further. This is LZ's best album, and it's not even a close contest. I love the debut, and I'm a big fan of III and HOTH as well, but II is inarguably one of the greatest albums by anyone, ever.
          "But I don't want to go among mad people."
          "Oh, you can't help that, we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."
          "How do you know I'm mad?"
          "You must be or you wouldn't have come here."

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          • #6
            The "best ever" argument is always subjective & can never be definitive... It's an incredible piece of work but I personally prefer the debut record... It's all a matter of taste, but both would feature in any top ten I ever cared to list, along with III.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by devilmaycare View Post
              The "best ever" argument is always subjective & can never be definitive... It's an incredible piece of work but I personally prefer the debut record... It's all a matter of taste, but both would feature in any top ten I ever cared to list, along with III.
              I agree... Led Zeppelin I just has better songs, and there's more of a dark atmosphere with the songs, which I like. "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" and "Dazed and Confused" are two of the best rock songs of all time, while "Good Times Bad Times" and "Communication Breakdown" are two awesome rockers. Also, you have a wonderful ballad in "Your Time is Gonna Come", and three bluesy epics with "You Shook Me", "I Can't Quit You Baby" and "How Many More Times". Basically, it's an incredibly powerful and stunning album that never lets up. Led Zeppelin II is great as well, but it's got a few songs that don't do a whole lot for me... "Living Loving Maid", "Moby Dick" (the drum solo on this song is kind of boring... there are better, more exciting drum solos) and "What is and What should Never Be".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by devilmaycare View Post
                The "best ever" argument is always subjective & can never be definitive... It's an incredible piece of work but I personally prefer the debut record... It's all a matter of taste, but both would feature in any top ten I ever cared to list, along with III.
                Oh yes, 'best ever' talk, in music, is always contentious, and never final. But mate, I'd go further and say that I regard Zeppelin's 'first five' records in succession, to be their blatantly best, ever. And then came the decline, the sudden demise of Bonzo, and the prompt disbanding of this rock colossus. :(

                SabbathSteve, you sure make a perfect overview of the debut Led Zeppelin record. It's an incredibly irony how Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Van Halen, Led Zeppelin and a handful of other iconic rock acts have all put out landmark magnificent debut albums (self-titled or otherwise). LZ is a masterclass, no doubt, but I honestly thought LZ II stepped up the ante even more and was an even classier follow-up release, overall. Moby Dick is nothing spectacular, but pretty darn good, nonetheless. And I love Living Loving Maid a whole lot. What is and What Should Never Be isn't stellar to begin with, but I really dig the latter half of the song. And oh, The Lemon Song and Ramble On, alone, (need I even talk of Whole Lotta Love? ) make LZ II a stand-out special Zeppelin classic.
                "Actors really are the scum of the earth. Their behavior makes arrogant, overpaid rock stars appear positively noble' - Buzz Osborne

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                • #9
                  And "Heartbreaker" is one of THE great riffs of all time.
                  He is not here. He has risen!

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                  • #10
                    See what I mean that when it comes to talking of invincible records like LZ II, there's no point in dissecting and separating the great from the good. I think I already mentioned how I find it a priceless, peerless rock record, from start to finish. The riffs and those rapid runs on Heartbreaker that Jimmy dishes out are breath-takingly, immortally cool. And some people think the only 'Brown Bomber' was Joe Louis LOL
                    "Actors really are the scum of the earth. Their behavior makes arrogant, overpaid rock stars appear positively noble' - Buzz Osborne

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SabbathSteve View Post
                      Led Zeppelin II is great as well, but it's got a few songs that don't do a whole lot for me... "Living Loving Maid", "Moby Dick" (the drum solo on this song is kind of boring... there are better, more exciting drum solos) and "What is and What should Never Be".
                      I love all three of those songs, perhaps unsurprisingly. One of the things I enjoy most about Zeppelin is the different textures to their songs. To illustrate by way of contrast, the songs on Dehumanizer in my view have no differences, which is why it's my least favorite Dio Sabbath album. WIAWSNB is the exact opposite. It's delicate, it's heavy, it's delicate again. I too could do without the drum solo on Moby Dick, but the main riff of the song ranks right up there with Heartbreaker's. And I think Living Loving Maid has always gotten short shrift because of its linkage with Heartbreaker. You won't get any criticism of the debut album from me though. Indeed, you have to wait for Physical Graffiti before the chinks in the armor show up.
                      "But I don't want to go among mad people."
                      "Oh, you can't help that, we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."
                      "How do you know I'm mad?"
                      "You must be or you wouldn't have come here."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Rules Mob View Post
                        I love all three of those songs, perhaps unsurprisingly. One of the things I enjoy most about Zeppelin is the different textures to their songs. To illustrate by way of contrast, the songs on Dehumanizer in my view have no differences, which is why it's my least favorite Dio Sabbath album. WIAWSNB is the exact opposite. It's delicate, it's heavy, it's delicate again. I too could do without the drum solo on Moby Dick, but the main riff of the song ranks right up there with Heartbreaker's. And I think Living Loving Maid has always gotten short shrift because of its linkage with Heartbreaker. You won't get any criticism of the debut album from me though. Indeed, you have to wait for Physical Graffiti before the chinks in the armor show up.
                        interesting that you say that about Physical Graffiti. I think the only problem with that album is that it is a double album, so there are some songs that seem like filler. If they took all of the best songs from that album and they put it into one disc, it would probably be ranked as one of the top 5 albums ever made:

                        1. In The Light
                        2. In My Time of Dying
                        3. The Rover
                        4. Ten Years Gone
                        5. Bron-yr-aur
                        6. Trampled Underfoot
                        7. Kashmir

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SabbathSteve View Post
                          interesting that you say that about Physical Graffiti. I think the only problem with that album is that it is a double album, so there are some songs that seem like filler. If they took all of the best songs from that album and they put it into one disc, it would probably be ranked as one of the top 5 albums ever made:

                          1. In The Light
                          2. In My Time of Dying
                          3. The Rover
                          4. Ten Years Gone
                          5. Bron-yr-aur
                          6. Trampled Underfoot
                          7. Kashmir
                          Funny u brought that up, I was thinking the same exact thing yesterday when I posted my IN THE LIGHT thread. Had PG been a single album, it would have been considerred by many as good as II & IV (ZOSO).
                          "Music is so sacred to me that I cant hear wishy-washy nonsense just played for the sake of selling records."
                          R. Blackmore

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                          • #14
                            ^^and more interesting still, how both of you feel the same way I do about Physical Graffiti. I have already commented earlier, on how I still think being a double-LP was one major factor that clearly hurt this otherwise excellent '75 release. Some songs, (Black Country Woman, Boogie with Stu) while definitely not sucky, do sound rather average and filler-like material. And, the flow of the songs occasionally sound like a pretty patched-up job, akin to the compilation of different shows that a lot of live albums often are.

                            SabbathSteve, you have a neat idea (and list) of what could have been a leaner, meaner single LP, instead. I'll shock some of you by saying that I never cared for Kashmir, much at all. I'd much rather substitute that with one of my PG favourites, Sick Again, and also include the cool rocker The Wanton Song. I'd prefer Houses of the Holy be the title track on the album where it properly belongs.

                            No such headaches with LZ II, though. Leaves you punch-drunk, from start to end.
                            "Actors really are the scum of the earth. Their behavior makes arrogant, overpaid rock stars appear positively noble' - Buzz Osborne

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SabbathSteve View Post
                              I think the only problem with that album is that it is a double album, so there are some songs that seem like filler. If they took all of the best songs from that album and they put it into one disc, it would probably be ranked as one of the top 5 albums ever made:
                              It's funny how often that's the case with double studio albums. That was the knock on GNR's Illusions and I've read that George Martin pleaded wtih the Beatles to boil "The White Album" down to just a single disc. The Illusions have some filler, The White Album doesn't. I love HOTH (much more than the untitled fourth album), so I guess PG is the start of the decline for Zeppelin.
                              "But I don't want to go among mad people."
                              "Oh, you can't help that, we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."
                              "How do you know I'm mad?"
                              "You must be or you wouldn't have come here."

                              Comment

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