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70's Judas Priest vs 80's Judas Priest.

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  • #61
    Grew up mainly on the 80's priest goods. But I still cannot get past the 70's music. The 80's made them the Metal Gods, but the 70's put them on the map. Halfords vocals in the 70's was prime stuff. Cannot be topped even to this day.His voice was more pronounced through the 80's. KK and Tipton have always been at their best through both era's, hard to compare either time. I would have loved to have seen them live back in the early 70's during Sad wings, or Stained Class. Steel was my first tour.Live they definitely transcended in the 80's and brought forth the true metal show that every band has since tried to emulate. So it is hard to actually decide which era for me is the best... so..I just listen to all of it equally.

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    • #62
      I’m voting for 70’s Priest.

      Rocka Rolla, Sad Wings of Destiny, Sin after Sin, Stained Class and Hell Bent for Leather are all great albums, with Sad Wings and Sin after Sin being my favorites of the entire Priest catalog.

      British Steel, Screaming for Vengeance and Defenders of the Faith are all good albums, I can take or leave Point of Entry and I don’t care for Turbo or Ram It Down at all.

      Painkiller has its moments. Again, I can take or leave it.

      I never really got into Jugulator or Demolition. I just feel they were trying too hard and it didn’t work. One of these days I’ll have to give them a spin again.

      Angel of Retribution has a few good moments, Nostradamus was forgettable and Redeemer of Souls has grown on me.
      Good Beer is the perfect blend of Art & Science.

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      • #63
        Can't really make a clear division between 70's and 80's Priest, 'cause I think their golden era was from 1976 (Sad Wings) to 1984 (Defenders). Rocka Rolla was a pretty shitty album, but after that they made a string of classic albums. Only low point during that time-span was Point Of Entry, but rest of the albums range from great to classic.

        After Defenders they had couple of really sup-bar outings with a couple classic tracks sprinkled on them. If I had to choose, I guess I'd go with the 70's Priest.

        Then came the 90's and Painkiller. It is a solid, solid album, but in some ways bit of an hard listen: they wen't super metal on that one, and while it has some of their greatest tunes ever (title track, Nighcrawler, Hell Patrol, A Touch Of Evil), it can be a bit cartoonish at times too. I'd give it a ***/*****

        Ripper era sucks for the most part, Angel Of Retribution was a return to form with couple of great tracks that have stood the test of time so far, but it's a pretty mediocre album when compared to their classic era and Painkiller. Nostradamus has only one song that stands from the lot (Prophecy), and it was a major dissapointment to me personally. Redeemer Of Souls is IMO their best since Painkiller. Vintage Priest sound with some really stellar song writing. Crossfire, the title track and March Of The Damned are all damn good songs, even if the last one bares more than a few similarities to 'Metal Gods'.
        "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
        "Just take a look around you what do you see/Pain, suffering, and misery/It's not the way that the world was planned/It's a pity you don't understand" - Geezer Butler
        "If god is in heaven/How can this happen here" - Phil Lynott (1949-1986)

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        • #64
          Rocks Rolla is classic.
          "Without Black Sabbath there never would have been an Ozzy, and without Ozzy there never would have been a Black Sabbath"
          "If there ever was a band whose voice is so significant and distinct, that band is Black Sabbath and the voice is Ozzy Osbourne"
          ________________________________________OzzyIsDio_ (YoY)

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          • #65
            70's for me, although I've probably listened to Screaming for Vengeance more than any other Priest album. Sad Wings still remains my favourite..just.

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            • #66
              When I first got into metal and Priest was during the 80s so those were the albums I started with, it wasn't until a little later that I discovered the 70s era stuff. Now I can say I love both eras but if pushed to choose I would say the 70s era as it was a bit darker and more adventurous.
              Sinister Realm-Traditional 80s Metal
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              • #67
                So I recently bought Sad Wings of Destiny. I have listened to it a number of times but I am still not quite getting it. Is it a grower? Should I keep trying to listen to it?

                Honestly, Painkiller is my favorite Judas Priest album and I don't think that will change. I know a lot of people boats Sad Wings above them all and I'm still going to keep listening.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by jstheconqueror View Post
                  So I recently bought Sad Wings of Destiny. I have listened to it a number of times but I am still not quite getting it. Is it a grower? Should I keep trying to listen to it?

                  Honestly, Painkiller is my favorite Judas Priest album and I don't think that will change. I know a lot of people boats Sad Wings above them all and I'm still going to keep listening.
                  Sad Wings of Destiny has many Heavy Judas Priest songs that are very good. I think the same Sad Wings of Destiny songs sound better on the Unleashed in the East live album. Unleashed has better production and vocals.

                  I would give Sad Wings a few more listen because Dreamer Deceiver/Deceiver and Island of Domination are both classic gems.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by jstheconqueror View Post
                    So I recently bought Sad Wings of Destiny. I have listened to it a number of times but I am still not quite getting it. Is it a grower? Should I keep trying to listen to it?

                    Honestly, Painkiller is my favorite Judas Priest album and I don't think that will change. I know a lot of people boats Sad Wings above them all and I'm still going to keep listening.
                    Personally, I loved Sad Wings on first listen. Conversely, I've never been much of a fan of Painkiller.
                    Monty Python and the Holy Grail pic extravaganza! http://www.black-sabbath.com/vb/showthread.php?t=31523

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by jstheconqueror View Post
                      So I recently bought Sad Wings of Destiny. I have listened to it a number of times but I am still not quite getting it. Is it a grower? Should I keep trying to listen to it?

                      Honestly, Painkiller is my favorite Judas Priest album and I don't think that will change. I know a lot of people boats Sad Wings above them all and I'm still going to keep listening.

                      It certainly does not have the viscerally-crushing impact of Painkiller, but it represents Judas Priest's synthesis of the influences of Black Sabbath, Queen, Bowie, and Zeppelin into something new and thereby allowing the band to move creatively in a direction that for the most part defied comparison. The sheer artistry that the band displays on SWoD is nothing short of magnificent - the lyrics are exceptional and the performances are tight. The songs have an amazing degree of transportative power.
                      gadji beri bimba glandridi laula lonni cadori - Ball

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Icy Sun View Post
                        Personally, I loved Sad Wings on first listen. Conversely, I've never been much of a fan of Painkiller.
                        It is not that I don't like it but it's just "plain" compared to the beast that is Painkiller. I am going to listen to Sad Wings with headphones on tonight.

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                        • #72
                          P
                          Originally posted by Vynlsol View Post
                          It certainly does not have the viscerally-crushing impact of Painkiller, but it represents Judas Priest's synthesis of the influences of Black Sabbath, Queen, Bowie, and Zeppelin into something new and thereby allowing the band to move creatively in a direction that for the most part defied comparison. The sheer artistry that the band displays on SWoD is nothing short of magnificent - the lyrics are exceptional and the performances are tight. The songs have an amazing degree of transportative power.
                          You always have a wonderful way of describing music Vynlsol, and you've done it again. Beautifully summed up and to the point.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Icy Sun View Post
                            Personally, I loved Sad Wings on first listen. Conversely, I've never been much of a fan of Painkiller.
                            I like Painkiller a lot. I have not listened to Sad Wings of Destiny in its entirety, but the songs I've heard from it are great.
                            You tried to suppress me
                            But nothing holds me down
                            Just when you think you're happy
                            I come around

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Vynlsol View Post
                              It certainly does not have the viscerally-crushing impact of Painkiller, but it represents Judas Priest's synthesis of the influences of Black Sabbath, Queen, Bowie, and Zeppelin into something new and thereby allowing the band to move creatively in a direction that for the most part defied comparison. The sheer artistry that the band displays on SWoD is nothing short of magnificent - the lyrics are exceptional and the performances are tight. The songs have an amazing degree of transportative power.
                              Just wanted to say that I appreciated that. I understand the album much better. My favorites are The Ripper and Tyrant. Still not keen on the ballads though but it's an enjoyable album.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Jack the Stripper View Post
                                You always have a wonderful way of describing music Vynlsol, and you've done it again. Beautifully summed up and to the point.
                                That's very kind of you to say, thank you!

                                Originally posted by jstheconqueror
                                Just wanted to say that I appreciated that. I understand the album much better. My favorites are The Ripper and Tyrant. Still not keen on the ballads though but it's an enjoyable album.
                                I applaud your determination to find out why some people hold SWoD in such high regard. Whenever I hear The Ripper I can almost smell the lampblack and piss of a late nineteenth-century London alley. Glad you're enjoying it!
                                gadji beri bimba glandridi laula lonni cadori - Ball

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