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  • #31
    Re: Nostradamus

    For some reason I love Angel of Retribution and Painkiller. AOR is not nearly as popular as the 'classic' Priest albums but somehow it just resonates with me.
    http://theramblingelf.tumblr.com/ - my Tumblog (music reviews galore!)
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    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Nostradamus

      For some reason I love Angel of Retribution and Painkiller. AOR is not nearly as popular as the 'classic' Priest albums but somehow it just resonates with me.
      http://theramblingelf.tumblr.com/ - my Tumblog (music reviews galore!)
      http://twitter.com/TheRamblingElf - my Twitter
      http://www.facebook.com/rwarrell - my Facebook

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Nostradamus

        Ashley is one of these - schizophrenic or poser. I pick the latter.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Nostradamus

          Ashley, as usual you make your points in a very articulate way and exhibit an almost-encyclopaedic knowledge of Judas Priest. However, there are a few things I differ with you on.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby When a person listens to the trinity of albums in the 70's, Sad Wings Of Destiny, Sin After Sin, Stained Class, they hear a band that made intelligent sophisticated epic pieces that demands respect.
          Agreed. But I did not hear those early Priest albums until well after I heard <span style="font-style: italic">British Steel</span>. A friend of mine had <span style="font-style: italic">British Steel</span> when I was in the 9th grade (1980-81) and I thought it was really cool. I was in my Van Halen phase at that time, having seen them in '80, and I was looking for a fix for harder stuff. <span style="font-style: italic">Steel</span> provided that, and got me into the NWOBHM (a fixation I still have). I first got <span style="font-style: italic">Stained Class</span> in about '82 and <span style="font-style: italic">Sad Wings</span> (on import) in '83. I heard <span style="font-style: italic">Sin after Sin</span> around the same time but I actually didn't like it because I thought the guitar sounds were too thin and I hated "Last Rose of Summer" and "Here Come The Tears". I've warmed up to it though and have the remastered version (Canadian issue).

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby But as is the case with EVERY BAND like that, these albums were not accessible to the majority, so they made the band very little money. And rather you want to admit it or not, no musicians choose to make music their career of choice and not expect to get for it.
          At the time there was no way I would have considered <span style="font-style: italic">Steel</span> to be "commercial". With the exception of Sabbath's <span style="font-style: italic">Heaven and Hell</span> (along with <span style="font-style: italic">Steel</span>, one of my two Desert Island Discs) the album was heavier than anything my friends or I owned at that time: Van Halen, Ted Nugent, Cheap Trick, KISS, Rush, etc.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Then at first glance you got British Steel, an album full of songs that feature:

          <span style="font-weight: bold">Simple Riffs</span>
          I remember Halford saying at the time that they intentionally simplified things and recorded the album essentially as a "live-in-the-studio" with very few overdubs, which of course was the going thing in Britain at that time.

          <span style="font-weight: bold">Wimpy Passages</span>
          What?! Outside of "Living After Midnight" and maybe "Breaking The Law" no way did I then or now consider anything on that album "wimpy." <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span> fits that description moreso with me, and we won't even talk about <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>.

          <span style="font-weight: bold">Only 1 or 2 Falsetto Screams</span>
          I wouldn't have thought of that, but at that time I wasn't aware that Halford was a "screamer". The only "screamer" I was aware of was Ian Gillan, and some of David Lee Roth's early stuff with VH.

          <span style="font-weight: bold">Shorter Songs</span>
          <span style="font-weight: bold">More Streamlined Styling</span>
          Again, the NWOBHM-inspired trend toward simplicity.

          <span style="font-weight: bold">Clearer Sonic Production</span>
          It sounded fresh, like a new band, again the "live-in-the-studio" feel. It kind of makes me shake my head, because Tom Allom did such a good job on <span style="font-style: italic">Steel</span> but yet managed to balls up virtually everything they did with him afterward.
          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby All of those things are going to reward you money and make you popular, though with success comes those jealous ones who will always use the 'Sell-Out' card, simply because they have nothing better to do with their time.
          I never considered Priest to be "selling out" with anything, except maybe for some of the stuff on <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span>, and spots on <span style="font-style: italic">Screaming For Vengeance</span> and <span style="font-style: italic">Defenders Of The Faith</span>.

          Then there was <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>...sorry to keep slagging that, but I almost cried when I heard that, with the exception of "Turbo Lover" and "Out In The Cold". I saw that tour in Detroit (my first and to date only time seeing them), with Dokken opening, and I hated it. The "robot" stage set and MTV stage dress looked goofy and they used the guitar synths on the old songs! "Victim Of Changes" with <span style="font-style: italic"><span style="font-weight: bold">eeermmm...bleep...rraaamm</span></span>! Dokken were better. My then-girlfriend had seen Priest before and said they were much better on previous tours. I heard rumours that they had a "ghost" drummer on electronic drums doing the fills that Dave Holland couldn't do live.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby But British Steel had character, it had class, it had balls. The very things that most popular albums do not have. Mostly because bands abandon their own character because they know being different will give them that nice luxurious house. But British Steel is no different than other Priest albums, it's just the logical progression from Killing Machine.
          No argument on the "character, class and balls" aspects. But when I bought <span style="font-style: italic">Hell Bent For Leather</span> on LP later after getting into <span style="font-style: italic">British Steel</span> I thought it sounded quite different ("Before The Dawn", "Evening Star"), though still good. I still feel that way about <span style="font-style: italic">Killing Machine</span> (I have the Canadian CD issue with that title; I never understood why it was retitled for the US market).

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby So in truth what happened was, while most bands will say, "If we abandon all the things that make us who we are, we will make money? Okay, where do we sign.
          <span style="font-style: italic">Tur</span>...OK, you get it. <span style="font-style: italic">Ram It Down</span>, too, though that was marginally better, Halford's horrible lyrics ("thousands of cars and a million guitars"?) and the cringe-worthy cover of "Johnny B. Goode" aside. Also, remember about that time they were considering covering "You Keep Me Hangin' On" with Stock Aitken Waterman (the prime movers behind Kylie Minogue OBE) producing? Not to be gay-bashing, but was Rob being unduly influenced by what he was hearing in clubs he may have frequented?

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Whereas in Priest's case with British Steel they said, "Fuck You, You will either like us or hate us for who we are, but you can ALWAYS be sure that what you are hearing is Judas Fucking Priest"
          Limited agreement on that one, for reasons I've already stated.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Most artists/bands who do that fail tremendously and sure Priest could have too, but they played it smart. Got an excellent producer, got a worthy drummer and made something they knew everyone like.
          I've already stated my opinions on Tom Allom and Dave Holland. I thought Les Binks was much better. I would have liked to have heard Martin Birch produce Priest. I thought Chris Tsangarides was a very good choice for <span style="font-style: italic">Painkiller</span>, as he did a very good job on Anvil's <span style="font-style: italic">Metal On Metal</span> and <span style="font-style: italic">Forged In Fire</span>.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Seriously what is more Heavy Metal than the last one minute and forty-five seconds of Steeler?
          Got me on that one! I think that particular song had an unheralded influence on the later "thrash metal" boom.

          Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby They were creative for making Sad Wings Of Destiny Part III? There is only two Priest albums that I cannot stand to listen to today and those are: Screaming For Vengeance and Stained Class, and it's not because of how many times I've heard it, or because of how popular it may or may not have become. But because they are mind-numbingly boring and it took only a few spins to reach that conclusion.
          We part company on that one too. I really like <span style="font-style: italic">Stained Class</span>, always have. Some of Halford's finest lyrics. I've already stated my Priest "unlistenables": 90% of <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>, about half of <span style="font-style: italic">Ram It Down</span>, and <span style="font-style: italic">Priest...Live!</span> (one of the flattest sounding "live" albums I've ever heard; maybe it's just because I saw that tour and hated it). I'm one of the only people on the planet who liked the stuff they did with "Ripper" Owens.

          I hope <span style="font-style: italic">Nostradamus</span> doesn't enter my "unlistenables" category.
          He is not here. He has risen!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Nostradamus

            Originally Posted By: Caeros Stained Class is mind-numbingly boring? Holy shit, now I've heard it all...
            yeah, I can't quite understand that statement either. How anybody finds such metal classics like "Exciter", "Better by you, Better than Me", "Saints in Hell", "Beyond the Realms of Death", and "Heroe's End" to be anything but awesome is beyond me. I'll never understand that. Ashley sure seems to hate a lot of JP's albums for someone who thinks of them as their favorite band.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Nostradamus

              Originally Posted By: Caeros Stained Class is mind-numbingly boring? Holy shit, now I've heard it all...
              yeah, I can't quite understand that statement either. How anybody finds such metal classics like "Exciter", "Better by you, Better than Me", "Saints in Hell", "Beyond the Realms of Death", and "Heroe's End" to be anything but awesome is beyond me. I'll never understand that. Ashley sure seems to hate a lot of JP's albums for someone who thinks of them as their favorite band.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Nostradamus

                Originally Posted By: JEFFMETAL Ashley is one of these - schizophrenic or poser. I pick the latter.
                Yup, that's me, you've done figured me out.

                Ya know I was just going to let it go and not respond to this thread any more, but DiosSword, after all that effort I changed my mind. So here goes....

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Then at first glance you got British Steel, an album full of songs that feature:

                <span style="font-weight: bold">Wimpy Passages</span>
                What?! Outside of "Living After Midnight" and maybe "Breaking The Law" no way did I then or now consider anything on that album "wimpy." <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span> fits that description moreso with me, and we won't even talk about <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>.
                I was never intending to say the songs were wimpy, but when you compare the passages to the ones on Call For The Priest, Run Of The Mill, Heroes End, Delivering The Goods, Tyrant, they pale in comparison. I was speaking more about technicality of the instrumentation as opposed to the riffs, breaks and coda's themselves.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby All of those things are going to reward you money and make you popular, though with success comes those jealous ones who will always use the 'Sell-Out' card, simply because they have nothing better to do with their time.
                I never considered Priest to be "selling out" with anything, except maybe for some of the stuff on <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span>, and spots on <span style="font-style: italic">Screaming For Vengeance</span> and <span style="font-style: italic">Defenders Of The Faith</span>.

                Then there was <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>...sorry to keep slagging that, but I almost cried when I heard that, with the exception of "Turbo Lover" and "Out In The Cold". I saw that tour in Detroit (my first and to date only time seeing them), with Dokken opening, and I hated it. The "robot" stage set and MTV stage dress looked goofy and they used the guitar synths on the old songs! "Victim Of Changes" with <span style="font-style: italic"><span style="font-weight: bold">eeermmm...bleep...rraaamm</span></span>! Dokken were better. My then-girlfriend had seen Priest before and said they were much better on previous tours. I heard rumours that they had a "ghost" drummer on electronic drums doing the fills that Dave Holland couldn't do live.
                I remember when Turbo! came out too and it was an amazing time for them. While I understand that the sound is different and most will not like it, it was another thing Priest could add to their then already impressive resume, that being the synths and all. Other metal bands had already used synths and recorded directly into digital, so why couldn't Priest?

                In the twenty-two years since Turbo I have always taken flack for liking it, but I have yet to see what the problem is. Sure some of the lyrics were not good, but this is not Neil Peart at work here is it? Besides Priest have always written in a fantasy comic book like fashion, and the reason they choose to do so is entirely their own right. Furthermore it is with moments like on Turbo, where they wrote in a more real life approach, Parental Guidance anyone, to where it comes across like what in Satan's name were they thinking. But then again I never really listened to Priest for their lyrical content, it was their music that made them great to me. Plus Priest has hundreds of songs over forty years, some better than others, sure, but even if Turbo does host mostly bad songs, it also houses one of the bands crowning achievements in the form of Reckless. Some argue as into what is 'Metal', but no matter what the opinion is, all should include: Energy, Balls, Characters and Passion. What Priest song has all those elements combined mixed with organic luscious sonic beauty of the synthesizers?

                I've said it before, many times, the ONLY reason people dislike Turbo is because it had the most commerical sound of any album. Yet the same people who scream SELL-OUT are the same people who will scream THIS BAND <span style="font-weight: bold">ALWAYS</span> SOUNDS THE SAME. Well which is it? A band is damned if they do, damned if they do not. Priest are the only band I know whom I like everything they've done, some I just do not like as much as others. Case in point is Stained Class and Screaming For Vengeance and Painkiller, but even those three had some great moments with, Savage, Bloodstone and All Guns Blazing respectively. But where all three falter is they are far too consistent for someone like me who enjoys those who are brave enough to throw a Country song right in the middle of their Thrash Metal album.

                Led Zeppelin and a certain three piece band(No NOT RUSH) were the two bands that implemented that idea into Metal, in a convincing way: IT'S NOT HEAVY IF IT'S ALWAYS HEAVY.

                You have to throw in those moments that are soft and reflective, that way when it returns to Heavy it totally SLAYS. Priest once had that, even with the so-called 'failures' like Demolition, but then came Painkiller and that idea died along with it...

                Going back to Turbo though for a second. I seen the band twice on the Fuel For Life tour, which was a great tour in fact, the most times I seen them on one tour with Rob Halford. It was my second and third times seeing them and they did not do Reckless. That would be, to me anyway, the biggest personal disappointment of their career.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby But British Steel had character, it had class, it had balls. The very things that most popular albums do not have. Mostly because bands abandon their own character because they know being different will give them that nice luxurious house. But British Steel is no different than other Priest albums, it's just the logical progression from Killing Machine.
                No argument on the "character, class and balls" aspects. But when I bought <span style="font-style: italic">Hell Bent For Leather</span> on LP later after getting into <span style="font-style: italic">British Steel</span> I thought it sounded quite different ("Before The Dawn", "Evening Star"), though still good. I still feel that way about <span style="font-style: italic">Killing Machine</span> (I have the Canadian CD issue with that title; I never understood why it was retitled for the US market).
                I find it remarkable funny that you have singled out the ballads on albums(Last Rose Of Summer, Here Comes The Tears, Before The Dawn, Evening Star) that you are NOT fond of, yet the album you dislike the most by Priest, one of the two songs you enjoyed was the ballad.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby So in truth what happened was, while most bands will say, "If we abandon all the things that make us who we are, we will make money? Okay, where do we sign.
                <span style="font-style: italic">Tur</span>...OK, you get it. <span style="font-style: italic">Ram It Down</span>, too, though that was marginally better, Halford's horrible lyrics ("thousands of cars and a million guitars"?) and the cringe-worthy cover of "Johnny B. Goode" aside. Also, remember about that time they were considering covering "You Keep Me Hangin' On" with Stock Aitken Waterman (the prime movers behind Kylie Minogue OBE) producing? Not to be gay-bashing, but was Rob being unduly influenced by what he was hearing in clubs he may have frequented?
                Once again, yes the lyrics were inept but the way Rob sings several passages in the songs made up for it. His improvising at the tail end of Love You To Death is one of my favorite moments by the band. Someone here a week or so ago mentioned that Priest have ALWAYS made questionable decisions in their management of things and the claim does hold true to your announcement of that cover song. Turning down Reckless for Top Gun and participating in Johnny B. Goode was a huge step back for any band.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Seriously what is more Heavy Metal than the last one minute and forty-five seconds of Steeler?
                Got me on that one! I think that particular song had an unheralded influence on the later "thrash metal" boom.
                I would agree on that one, it is also my favorite Priest song...EVER.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby They were creative for making Sad Wings Of Destiny Part III? There is only two Priest albums that I cannot stand to listen to today and those are: Screaming For Vengeance and Stained Class, and it's not because of how many times I've heard it, or because of how popular it may or may not have become. But because they are mind-numbingly boring and it took only a few spins to reach that conclusion.
                We part company on that one too. I really like <span style="font-style: italic">Stained Class</span>, always have. Some of Halford's finest lyrics.
                Actually the majority of them were written in large part with Glenn. It's not that I detest the album, actually BBYBTM, Savage, Heroes End, White Heat, Red Hot and Invader are all fabulous songs, but the title track has one of the worst vocal performances Rob has ever laid down. "Hey want to hear Rob scream for no reason like he does in Painkiller and on but back in the 1970's when he was supposed to be all perfect?"..."Listen to the second verse of Stained Class, the 'Transfixed at deliverance, is this all there is. Faithless continuum, into the abyss' Part." Sure the lyrics were brilliant and very poetic but the way they were sung was cringe-worthy to say the least.

                Originally Posted By: DiosSword I'm one of the only people on the planet who liked the stuff they did with "Ripper" Owens.
                People here know how I feel about Tim, so there is no reason to indulge into it. But I will say that anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best, at least from 1984 and on, since '84 was the first year I ever seen them. From Defenders until now there has been eight tours in support of studio albums, six with Rob and two with Tim. In two tours with Tim I've seen them just as many times as I did with Rob. It's pointless to say who is better because people are going to automatically right off the replacement, but as I just said: Anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Nostradamus

                  Originally Posted By: JEFFMETAL Ashley is one of these - schizophrenic or poser. I pick the latter.
                  Yup, that's me, you've done figured me out.

                  Ya know I was just going to let it go and not respond to this thread any more, but DiosSword, after all that effort I changed my mind. So here goes....

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Then at first glance you got British Steel, an album full of songs that feature:

                  <span style="font-weight: bold">Wimpy Passages</span>
                  What?! Outside of "Living After Midnight" and maybe "Breaking The Law" no way did I then or now consider anything on that album "wimpy." <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span> fits that description moreso with me, and we won't even talk about <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>.
                  I was never intending to say the songs were wimpy, but when you compare the passages to the ones on Call For The Priest, Run Of The Mill, Heroes End, Delivering The Goods, Tyrant, they pale in comparison. I was speaking more about technicality of the instrumentation as opposed to the riffs, breaks and coda's themselves.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby All of those things are going to reward you money and make you popular, though with success comes those jealous ones who will always use the 'Sell-Out' card, simply because they have nothing better to do with their time.
                  I never considered Priest to be "selling out" with anything, except maybe for some of the stuff on <span style="font-style: italic">Point Of Entry</span>, and spots on <span style="font-style: italic">Screaming For Vengeance</span> and <span style="font-style: italic">Defenders Of The Faith</span>.

                  Then there was <span style="font-style: italic">Turbo</span>...sorry to keep slagging that, but I almost cried when I heard that, with the exception of "Turbo Lover" and "Out In The Cold". I saw that tour in Detroit (my first and to date only time seeing them), with Dokken opening, and I hated it. The "robot" stage set and MTV stage dress looked goofy and they used the guitar synths on the old songs! "Victim Of Changes" with <span style="font-style: italic"><span style="font-weight: bold">eeermmm...bleep...rraaamm</span></span>! Dokken were better. My then-girlfriend had seen Priest before and said they were much better on previous tours. I heard rumours that they had a "ghost" drummer on electronic drums doing the fills that Dave Holland couldn't do live.
                  I remember when Turbo! came out too and it was an amazing time for them. While I understand that the sound is different and most will not like it, it was another thing Priest could add to their then already impressive resume, that being the synths and all. Other metal bands had already used synths and recorded directly into digital, so why couldn't Priest?

                  In the twenty-two years since Turbo I have always taken flack for liking it, but I have yet to see what the problem is. Sure some of the lyrics were not good, but this is not Neil Peart at work here is it? Besides Priest have always written in a fantasy comic book like fashion, and the reason they choose to do so is entirely their own right. Furthermore it is with moments like on Turbo, where they wrote in a more real life approach, Parental Guidance anyone, to where it comes across like what in Satan's name were they thinking. But then again I never really listened to Priest for their lyrical content, it was their music that made them great to me. Plus Priest has hundreds of songs over forty years, some better than others, sure, but even if Turbo does host mostly bad songs, it also houses one of the bands crowning achievements in the form of Reckless. Some argue as into what is 'Metal', but no matter what the opinion is, all should include: Energy, Balls, Characters and Passion. What Priest song has all those elements combined mixed with organic luscious sonic beauty of the synthesizers?

                  I've said it before, many times, the ONLY reason people dislike Turbo is because it had the most commerical sound of any album. Yet the same people who scream SELL-OUT are the same people who will scream THIS BAND <span style="font-weight: bold">ALWAYS</span> SOUNDS THE SAME. Well which is it? A band is damned if they do, damned if they do not. Priest are the only band I know whom I like everything they've done, some I just do not like as much as others. Case in point is Stained Class and Screaming For Vengeance and Painkiller, but even those three had some great moments with, Savage, Bloodstone and All Guns Blazing respectively. But where all three falter is they are far too consistent for someone like me who enjoys those who are brave enough to throw a Country song right in the middle of their Thrash Metal album.

                  Led Zeppelin and a certain three piece band(No NOT RUSH) were the two bands that implemented that idea into Metal, in a convincing way: IT'S NOT HEAVY IF IT'S ALWAYS HEAVY.

                  You have to throw in those moments that are soft and reflective, that way when it returns to Heavy it totally SLAYS. Priest once had that, even with the so-called 'failures' like Demolition, but then came Painkiller and that idea died along with it...

                  Going back to Turbo though for a second. I seen the band twice on the Fuel For Life tour, which was a great tour in fact, the most times I seen them on one tour with Rob Halford. It was my second and third times seeing them and they did not do Reckless. That would be, to me anyway, the biggest personal disappointment of their career.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby But British Steel had character, it had class, it had balls. The very things that most popular albums do not have. Mostly because bands abandon their own character because they know being different will give them that nice luxurious house. But British Steel is no different than other Priest albums, it's just the logical progression from Killing Machine.
                  No argument on the "character, class and balls" aspects. But when I bought <span style="font-style: italic">Hell Bent For Leather</span> on LP later after getting into <span style="font-style: italic">British Steel</span> I thought it sounded quite different ("Before The Dawn", "Evening Star"), though still good. I still feel that way about <span style="font-style: italic">Killing Machine</span> (I have the Canadian CD issue with that title; I never understood why it was retitled for the US market).
                  I find it remarkable funny that you have singled out the ballads on albums(Last Rose Of Summer, Here Comes The Tears, Before The Dawn, Evening Star) that you are NOT fond of, yet the album you dislike the most by Priest, one of the two songs you enjoyed was the ballad.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby So in truth what happened was, while most bands will say, "If we abandon all the things that make us who we are, we will make money? Okay, where do we sign.
                  <span style="font-style: italic">Tur</span>...OK, you get it. <span style="font-style: italic">Ram It Down</span>, too, though that was marginally better, Halford's horrible lyrics ("thousands of cars and a million guitars"?) and the cringe-worthy cover of "Johnny B. Goode" aside. Also, remember about that time they were considering covering "You Keep Me Hangin' On" with Stock Aitken Waterman (the prime movers behind Kylie Minogue OBE) producing? Not to be gay-bashing, but was Rob being unduly influenced by what he was hearing in clubs he may have frequented?
                  Once again, yes the lyrics were inept but the way Rob sings several passages in the songs made up for it. His improvising at the tail end of Love You To Death is one of my favorite moments by the band. Someone here a week or so ago mentioned that Priest have ALWAYS made questionable decisions in their management of things and the claim does hold true to your announcement of that cover song. Turning down Reckless for Top Gun and participating in Johnny B. Goode was a huge step back for any band.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby Seriously what is more Heavy Metal than the last one minute and forty-five seconds of Steeler?
                  Got me on that one! I think that particular song had an unheralded influence on the later "thrash metal" boom.
                  I would agree on that one, it is also my favorite Priest song...EVER.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword
                  Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby They were creative for making Sad Wings Of Destiny Part III? There is only two Priest albums that I cannot stand to listen to today and those are: Screaming For Vengeance and Stained Class, and it's not because of how many times I've heard it, or because of how popular it may or may not have become. But because they are mind-numbingly boring and it took only a few spins to reach that conclusion.
                  We part company on that one too. I really like <span style="font-style: italic">Stained Class</span>, always have. Some of Halford's finest lyrics.
                  Actually the majority of them were written in large part with Glenn. It's not that I detest the album, actually BBYBTM, Savage, Heroes End, White Heat, Red Hot and Invader are all fabulous songs, but the title track has one of the worst vocal performances Rob has ever laid down. "Hey want to hear Rob scream for no reason like he does in Painkiller and on but back in the 1970's when he was supposed to be all perfect?"..."Listen to the second verse of Stained Class, the 'Transfixed at deliverance, is this all there is. Faithless continuum, into the abyss' Part." Sure the lyrics were brilliant and very poetic but the way they were sung was cringe-worthy to say the least.

                  Originally Posted By: DiosSword I'm one of the only people on the planet who liked the stuff they did with "Ripper" Owens.
                  People here know how I feel about Tim, so there is no reason to indulge into it. But I will say that anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best, at least from 1984 and on, since '84 was the first year I ever seen them. From Defenders until now there has been eight tours in support of studio albums, six with Rob and two with Tim. In two tours with Tim I've seen them just as many times as I did with Rob. It's pointless to say who is better because people are going to automatically right off the replacement, but as I just said: Anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Nostradamus

                    Originally Posted By: Ashley Dalby
                    Originally Posted By: DiosSword I'm one of the only people on the planet who liked the stuff they did with "Ripper" Owens.
                    People here know how I feel about Tim, so there is no reason to indulge into it. But I will say that anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best, at least from 1984 and on, since '84 was the first year I ever seen them. From Defenders until now there has been eight tours in support of studio albums, six with Rob and two with Tim. In two tours with Tim I've seen them just as many times as I did with Rob. It's pointless to say who is better because people are going to automatically right off the replacement, but as I just said: Anyone who missed the tours with Tim missed Priest at their best.
                    Ripper IS a fantastic vocalist. I love his work with Iced Earth, Beyond Fear, and I can't wait to hear Malmsteen's new album with him. And I actually do like Jugulator (Demolition is a different story). But to me, saying that Priest was at it's best with Ripper just doesn't make sense to me. What part of "former Judas Priest tribute band singer" is unclear? He purposely made himself sound like Halford (not that he sounds exactly like him but pretty damn close). This isn't like Sabbath where you have Dio, Ozzy, and Tony with distinct voices. Ripper is like the store brand Halford.

                    And that's all I have to say about Ripper.
                    So live for today
                    Tomorrow never comes

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Nostradamus

                      I love Ripper. I think if Rob Retires they should get Ripper back!
                      Sin after sin is a amazing album all priests albums were amazing.
                      and i really really love Demolition.
                      R.I.P. Ronald Padavona,Ronnie James Dio,DIO,Legend.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Nostradamus

                        I love Ripper. I think if Rob Retires they should get Ripper back!
                        Sin after sin is a amazing album all priests albums were amazing.
                        and i really really love Demolition.
                        R.I.P. Ronald Padavona,Ronnie James Dio,DIO,Legend.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Nostradamus

                          How can you guys bag on Nostradamus so soon? Its definitely not your typical Priest album but its also a concept album. I'm withholding my judgement until I hear some of these new tunes LIVE. If KK and Glenn drop the synth it will score major points with me.

                          Bottom line, give it some more time and a bunch more listens.
                          "I want to tell you, yeah
                          How Good It Feels
                          Sleeping here with you tonight
                          And thatís for real"
                          -Sometimes I'm Happy 8/5/75

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Nostradamus

                            How can you guys bag on Nostradamus so soon? Its definitely not your typical Priest album but its also a concept album. I'm withholding my judgement until I hear some of these new tunes LIVE. If KK and Glenn drop the synth it will score major points with me.

                            Bottom line, give it some more time and a bunch more listens.
                            "I want to tell you, yeah
                            How Good It Feels
                            Sleeping here with you tonight
                            And thatís for real"
                            -Sometimes I'm Happy 8/5/75

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: Nostradamus

                              It's starting to grow on me. At first I was put off by the sparse guitar. I'm use to in your face guitar from Glenn and KK but the more I listen the more I like it. And Rob sounds great as usual.

                              It would be cool if they played the album live with an orchestra.
                              The time it is coming when all life will end,
                              With doomsday approaching to hell we'll descend.
                              Religion won't save me, the damage is done.
                              The future has ended before it's begun.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: Nostradamus

                                Originally Posted By: NoWayOut I love Ripper. I think if Rob Retires they should get Ripper back!
                                Sin after sin is a amazing album all priests albums were amazing.
                                and i really really love Demolition.
                                I hope Rob never retires and if he leaves Priest I hope he just goes back to Fight or Halford. He made some great music in those bands.
                                The time it is coming when all life will end,
                                With doomsday approaching to hell we'll descend.
                                Religion won't save me, the damage is done.
                                The future has ended before it's begun.

                                Comment

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