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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Korps View Post
    I did watch that video, and not once does he mention head voice. He talks about Dio's open throat technique, mentioning that Dio did the vowel sounds in the back of his head rather than the front. Claiming that Dio used his head voice all the time goes against everything I've ever read and heard about chest and head registers.

    E5150 Starwanderer's link above has some worthwhile info on head voice.
    This is a very extensive detailed explanation of Ronnie's technique from one of my professional friends , there is nothing personal here so I guess she wouldn't mind me sharing it for general knowledge (some diagrams are missing here though) :

    "It's much like in sports. Once you've learned it you never going to lose it, but the muscles you need have become just too weak after such a long break. The "singing" muscles are all small ones, but many - starting from your belly and going up to your throat and face. The human vocal organ is just so amazingly complex. Did you know that there are 32 different muscles controlling the larynx alone, 16 on each side? There you go.

    I'm sure you've seen all these stupid posts about how Ron's voice has changed, but those good people just don't have the slightest clue how singing really works. Because there's only one single thing that has changed in fact - it's his vibrato frequency.

    Vibrato is a resonant oscillation of the air column that fills your lungs, windpipe, larynx, mouth, and the cavities behind your face, the sinuses. When you sing with vibrato, the pressure of the air against your vocal folds changes over time, with a characteristic frequency, making your voice resound powerfully in space. So when you sing a certain sustained note, you hold it at its fundamental frequency, but your voice will go just a tad higher, and then just a tad lower that that, oscillating up and down. When you plot those pitch changes against time, vibrato will show as rippled lines.

    In a frequency spectrum of Ronnie's vocals, it looks like this:



    buuuuuurned aan - other daaaaaaaaaaay


    The same vibrato may appear when you play a wind instrument, like the flute, or trumpet. Unlike the note itself, these vibrato oscillations originate not in the larynx, instead they come from deep down in your diaphragm, when you exhale against a backpressure.

    The diaphragm is the thin sheet of muscle separating your abdominal cavity, the belly, from your thoracal cavity, the lungs. This is the one muscle that regulates the pressure of air going from your lungs against your vocal folds, every time you say, hum, sing, shout, or scream something. Or, when you play the trumpet, the same air goes against the instrument as the primary airflow resistance. Most of the times we're not even aware of that muscle, although we use it all the time.

    When you play a wind instrument, all you've got to provide is regulated air pressure. The note will be generated in the mouth piece, and resonate in the instrument's body.

    When you sing, you generate the note in your own larynx, using the vocal folds to define its pitch. But the question is, where in your body will it resonate. As a well-trained singer, you can make it resonate in any place where it fills a cavity. In the chest, it will resonate at high frequency because the cavities in your lungs are many but small ones, the alveolae. You can feel this vibration when you put your hand on your chest and hum low notes, in speaking range.

    But when you sing at higher pitch than speaking range, the sound you make in your larynx will resonate somewhere in your head, like in your throat, oral cavity, and sinuses. When I sing with power in the head register, I can feel the vibration in my upper front teeth :-D

    Now these cavities are substantially larger than the many little alveolae in your lungs. So the sound will resonate at a lower frequency, as the pressure takes more time to travel from wall to wall inside the cavity, where it will bounce back and forth, and generate those ripples. Although you're singing at a higher pitch, controlled by the tension in your vocal folds - the vibrato frequency of even the highest note you can sing is always slower than in chest voice, because it resonates in larger cavities. Pure, straightforward physics.




    buuuuuurned aan - other daaaaaaaaaaay



    Look at the numbers above. The X axis is in seconds. Ronnie sings these words, in the head register, at a vibrato frequency of about 6 Hz, i.e. going up and down 6 times within one second. That's pretty slow! Now he's always had slow vibrato, simply because he's got a large head, and hence large sinuses. This is what makes his voice sound so characteristically "operatic".

    The Y axis is in kHz. You may wonder why, in a vocal frequency spectrum, you don't see only one single line. This line would correspond to the pitch of the note that is being sung, and would be rippled or straight, depending on whether the singer sings that note with or without vibrato.

    Instead you see many lines of various intensities, stacked above each other, resonating in synchrony. The notes he sings are obviously made up of many frequencies, stacked at a defined distance from each other. These are the fundamental notes of the melody, plus a stack of harmonic overtones - characteristic of each individual voice, or instrument. These overtones make all the difference between your voice and mine, between a piano and a guitar, all sung or played at the same fundamental pitch. You can easily tell a middle C, the very same note, if it's played on a piano, a guitar, or sung - by you, me, or Ronnie.

    A pure, single sound wave is called a sine wave. It consists of only one frequency, say middle C, represented as one single line in the frequency spectrum. It sounds totally artificial and "empty", like a computer beep. Even people with absolute pitch will have trouble telling a note when it's presented as a sine wave. The chain of nerve cells that decode sound on its way from our eardrum to our brain, the auditory pathway, hasn't evolved into an understanding of sine waves - simply because isolated sine waves occur nowhere in nature. Every natural tone created by a physical, vibrating structure has a fundamental, plus a unique stack of overtones, giving that tone a recognizable "timbre".

    The straight lines you see in the spectrum, left and right of the rippled vocal lines, that is the guitar. It has no vibrato, as acoustic guitar sound is generated by vibrating strings alone, without an additional, oscillating column of air, like in the vocals. But it still has its own characteristic stack of overtones, different than the voice, making it sound like "guitar".

    Back to the question, how and why Ronnie's voice has changed.

    People talk about a certain shakiness in his voice, in particular when he sings softly, and at high pitch. They say it makes him sound old and fragile, like he's just barely holding that note. But this is not about "fragility", or holding notes - at all.

    It's about the fact that his vibrato frequency, low as it's always been, has now dropped below the threshold of the temporal resolution of the listener's ear. The listener is now able to discern his pitch oscillations that come with his huge vibrato, and perceive them as fluctuation, simply because they've become so slow. So he's now vibrato-ing above and below his note so slowly that we will sometimes perceive this vibrato no longer as only powerful and fully resounding - but also a bit uncertain, "shaky".

    But it's not about shakiness of the voice as such, or a vocal thing at all - it's a cavity thing. Every singer's head vibrato will slow down with age. Just like the skin, the mucosal membranes lining the windpipe, mouth and sinuses will dry up with age and become thinner and thinner, making those cavities larger. Larger cavities - lower resonance frequency within those cavities - slower vibrato. Simple physics again.

    As your changing body is your only instrument, as a singer there's absolutely nothing you can do about that, other than keeping your mucosal membranes well lubricated. That's why singers on tour must constantly drink a lot of water, and inhale their vapors on every occasion.

    When you've got an allergy or infection, and your sinuses clog up, in the worst case scenario they will no longer resonate at all. Thanks to the singer's ultimate savior, cortisone, this rarely happens. But due to some residual swelling, your cavities have now become a bit smaller, and the swollen mucosa is also softer - absorbing much of the pressure oscillation that makes up vibrato, instead of bouncing it back and forth. Meaning that the amplitude of your vibrato, the height of those ripples, will now be reduced.

    Listen to Ronnie on RCMH. His vibrato is still there, but much less pronounced than usual. That's why he sounds different, more flat and dry. Later into the set, he partially recovers - probably thanks to sweating, which always helps reduce mucosal swelling. The well-known sauna effect.

    When he's in a state like that, he will use his oral cavity as a substitute for his clogged sinuses. You can see it in his facial movements, when he's doing that. He's skilled enough to make up for the larger part of the clogged-sinuses effect, that's why he can still sing when he's sick. But you can certainly hear the difference.

    Unlike other singers with smaller faces and foreheads, Ronnie's always had slow vibrato, he can't help it. He sings exclusively in the head register which is a smart thing for him to do, as he hasn't exactly got a large chest, no...? ;-)

    It's amazing really - when you look closely at his face while he's singing, you can actually see his cheeks and nostrils vibrating, at the same vibrato frequency of 8 -10 Hz that is so typical in him. His slow, at the same time extremely powerful head vibrato has always been one of those things that make him not a only good singer, but a great one.

    But now he's become sort of the unlucky one - that blessing may now turn into a curse. The age-related slowdown of his vibrato frequency has become more and more pronounced, while his vibrato amplitude has remained the same.


    The same words again. Look at the height and depth of the little mountains and valleys in his vocal spectrum. That is a HUGE vibrato amplitude, showing with just how much power he actually sings these words. Vocal power is not about volume, or loudness. You can shriek very loudly, but won't sound powerful, and you can sing very softly but with enormous power - when you know how to do it.

    Another hallmark of vocal power is the so-called 3K formant (here, more aptly named 2K formant), a particularly strong overtone somewhere between 1.5 and 3 kHz. Every singer in training strives to develop that one, but Ronnie's got it all out of himself. He's also got one of the brightest male voices I know, and I've studied many. Here you can see where that brightness comes from: he can turn it on by recruiting his 5K formant, a very rare trait in male voices.

    Listen to the words: "Burned" sounds much darker, although the fundamental is only a forth lower. No 5K formant there. "Day" sounds very bright, strong 5K formant.

    It's all about overtones really. Only the fundamental is the frequency of the actual note he sings.

    But - Ronnie's slower vibrato frequency now makes an audible difference to how we remember his younger voice, just BECAUSE he's still got that huge vibrato amplitude. That's the reason why we will now sometimes perceive his voice as shaking, or quivering. But it's solely for physical reasons, has nothing to do with declining ability.

    At this point in their career, other, larger-built singers will switch to chest voice entirely, although chest voice has a lower range. But it also has much higher vibrato frequency. So no audible quivering there, not even when you're 100. And then our good but totally ignorant forum members will say - Hah, now finally they've lost their range. Bullshit. They've changed their register, for this very good reason.

    But our little Ronnie can't do that. He's simply too small, to sing in chest voice and still sound great. So he will always push even his low notes right up into his head. That is an awesome accomplishment - not many singers can do it like he does. The only other one I know is Geoff Tate, although he's got a much larger chest, but rarely uses his chest voice - perhaps because it sounds good but totally different.

    Sometimes on stage, when Ronnie's running and jumping around like a maniac :-D , flirting with the front row and not really paying attention, he will accidentally slip into chest voice. When this happens, his volume drops significantly, his vibrato disappears instantly, and he sounds kinda thin, hollow, and insignificant. No surprise, because now he's no longer using the larger part of his resonant cavities. Like when there's a crack in the body of an acoustic guitar, it will make only "plink-plank-plonk" sounds. But he will usually recover from these glitches so quickly, most people never realize what's happening.

  2. #42
    Korps's Avatar
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    I'm gonna get back to this with more thought after the weekend, but a few things pop to mind right away.

    There seems to be some kind of terminological glitch here. I can see what your friend is saying about aging singers and physiological changes, but whenever I've seen vocal coaches talking about head voice vs. chest voice, they're talking about a different thing (when I have time, I'll try find an example video).

    Consider the intro vocal of The Sign of the Southern Cross. Based on what your friend is saying, how would you explain the difference in tone between the studio version and the Live Evil version, if Dio's always singing in head voice? To me it sounds like the studio version is sung in head voice and the live version in chest (except the "fade away" part, which is in head).

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by IRON-MaN View Post
    This is a very extensive detailed explanation of Ronnie's technique from one of my professional friends...
    Has she studied Ozzy's technique? I'd love to hear her analysis of that!
    In the fields the bodies burning, as the war machine keeps turning.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by WallOfSleep View Post
    Has she studied Ozzy's technique? I'd love to hear her analysis of that!
    Me too ! I've heard others but, never is too much!

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Korps View Post
    I'm gonna get back to this with more thought after the weekend, but a few things pop to mind right away.

    There seems to be some kind of terminological glitch here. I can see what your friend is saying about aging singers and physiological changes, but whenever I've seen vocal coaches talking about head voice vs. chest voice, they're talking about a different thing (when I have time, I'll try find an example video).

    Consider the intro vocal of The Sign of the Southern Cross. Based on what your friend is saying, how would you explain the difference in tone between the studio version and the Live Evil version, if Dio's always singing in head voice? To me it sounds like the studio version is sung in head voice and the live version in chest (except the "fade away" part, which is in head).
    Again and if you read her analysis carefully , RJD used his head register almost all the time , we used to catch a lot of Sabbath shows/tours together , she used to play and sing a while ago so she really knows what she's talking about , watching too many consecutive shows on tour she also got to explain a lot of RJD's signature poses while singing on stage and explained it to me in detail how it relates to his singing technique.

    From a pure technical perspective ( whether you like RJD or not) , he is definitely a head and shoulder above other guys like Plant , Gillan , Coverdale and Ozzy of course ! it's not about hitting those high notes , its how and when to do it without blowing your voice , RJD's consistency as a singer and performer is quite miraculous to say the least , to be at such age and to perform very technically tough songs on such a hectic schedule and NEVER to have a even close bad night is something truly brilliant !

    Also one of RJD's biggest tricks on stage is how he phrases the songs and words differently from one day to the other , he improvises at times and I love his perfect sense of timing ! always twisting little parts that makes each and every show quite distinctive from one another ! last time I got to hang out with RJD with some common friends was at H&H Germany tour (Ripper solo band opening + Axel Rudi Pell) back in 2009 , without showing off , RJD told me that one hour of his singing is equal to 2 hours of any other singer ! ever wondered why Dio Disciples has two vocals instead of one ? Ripper said he can't handle a whole of Dio songs on his own.

    Ironically many people might not know these facts , most of the latest Dio DVD's were recorded while he was sick or ill :

    1/ Holy Diver Live he traces of flu as far as I can remember and STILL managed to pull a killer two hours and half set with no freaking intermission !

    2/RCMH , RJD actually caught a very awful infection at Canada in the beginning of the tour and REFUSED to cancel any shows , at RCMH he was starting to recover , people who got to watch the band in Europe later that summer could tell how he sounded way better back then , and still his performance on RCMH puts almost everyone else in the business in complete shame

    3/Live At Europe (or Wacken) , well he already had some serious stomach pains at the time , and yet he was absolutely mind blowing on the whole tour.

    For those interested , my friend once got to ask RJD what was the toughest song to sing with Black Sabbath's live set back in 2009 and the answer ? 'Neon Knights' , anyway I will try to let me friend elaborate more on Ronnie's technique on different songs and versions when I drop her a line sometime soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by WallOfSleep View Post
    Has she studied Ozzy's technique? I'd love to hear her analysis of that!
    Not really , she didn't study RJD's technique for starters , she used to play and sing and we just got to discuss something regarding RJD from which she started explaining everything in details for me , unfortunately she was never a huge fan of Ozzy's voice , but I might drop her some samples and ask her for some analysis , the thing with RJD in particular is that she was a huge fan and got watch him on tour countless times around the world , I believe watching singers up close gives a better perspective on the technique as well , I remember we got to discuss Axel Rudi Pell's lead singer 'Johnny Gioeli' (brilliant singer by the way) and Ripper Owens because they were opening for H&H on their whole German tour leg dates back in 2009.

    Also for those interested , here is an old cool article of a classic teacher analyzing 5 metal singers Dickinson , Dio , Ozzy , Diamond head and Halford (not knowing any of them)
    http://www.invisibleoranges.com/2010...metal-singers/
    (Just notice that her analysis is based on a single unidentified song by each musician)
    Last edited by IRON-MaN; 07-21-2013 at 11:33 AM.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by IRON-MaN View Post
    Also for those interested , here is an old cool article of a classic teacher analyzing 5 metal singers Dickinson , Dio , Ozzy , Diamond head and Halford (not knowing any of them)
    http://www.invisibleoranges.com/2010...metal-singers/
    (Just notice that her analysis is based on a single unidentified song by each musician)
    Thanks for that IM!

    For those interested, here's what she said about Ozzy (War Pigs was the track she analyzed):

    Initial reaction: “Fourth guy is just bad throaty singing… Made my throat tight to listen to him. How long did his career last?”

    This is a singer with decent diction and good musical instincts but no command of vocal technique. He is massively over-adducting his vocal folds while driving enough air through them to get them to speak, but his throat is so tight that there is no flow or resonance. His rhythmic punctuation of the lyrics is very distracting, in contrast with Singer #1 [Bruce Dickinson] who delivered his text with rhythmic accents that served, rather than detracted from the flow of music and poetry. It hurt my throat so much to listen to him that I was tempted to ask Cosmo how long his career lasted before he either washed out or needed surgery. The entire range of his singing is contained within a single octave – with the exception of the moment when he yells “Oh Lord!” a little higher, in my opinion the only quasi-free vocal sound on the entire track.
    That was pretty harsh! I wonder what she would think about Symptom of the Universe or some later stuff?
    In the fields the bodies burning, as the war machine keeps turning.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by WallOfSleep View Post
    That was pretty harsh! I wonder what she would think about Symptom of the Universe or some later stuff?
    Just remember that was based on one song analysis ! Ozzy's peak as vocalist from a pure technical perspective were SBS and Sabotage , the studio take of 'War Pigs' is way far from Ozzy's best , his rhythmic punctuation of the lyrics became way better starting from 'Vol.4' on wards , still Ozzy's sense of timing 'live' is quite poor these days mainly because he forgets the lyrics and uses monitors most of the time , generally speaking , Ozzy's secret weapons as a singer are his magnificent vocal melodies and authentic distinctive voice.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by LouiST View Post
    In the first two albums Ozzy's range is basically one octave. Things went the same in early gigs.

    However, starting from Master of Reality, Ozzy started to sing higher notes. And higher, and higher. The highest point was reached during Sabotage.
    But what made Ozzy able to do so? In the earliest days Ozzy even had to struggle a bit to sing the songs from the first two albums.
    Not to mention Ozzy was not professionally trained.
    Yet he still did it, and in a brilliant way.

    Was it hard work? Drugs? Or Ozzy just wanted to do so?
    He was simply in his prime as a singer at that time. The cocaine probably helped him out a little, as well.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by IRON-MaN View Post
    Again and if you read her analysis carefully , RJD used his head register almost all the time , we used to catch a lot of Sabbath shows/tours together , she used to play and sing a while ago so she really knows what she's talking about , watching too many consecutive shows on tour she also got to explain a lot of RJD's signature poses while singing on stage and explained it to me in detail how it relates to his singing technique. From a pure technical perspective ( whether you like RJD or not) , he is definitely a head and shoulder above other guys like Plant , Gillan , Coverdale and Ozzy of course ! it's not about hitting those high notes , its how and when to do it without blowing your voice , RJD's consistency as a singer and performer is quite miraculous to say the least , to be at such age and to perform very technically tough songs on such a hectic schedule and NEVER to have a even close bad night is something truly brilliant ! Also one of RJD's biggest tricks on stage is how he phrases the songs and words differently from one day to the other , he improvises at times and I love his perfect sense of timing ! always twisting little parts that makes each and every show quite distinctive from one another ! last time I got to hang out with RJD with some common friends was at H&H Germany tour (Ripper solo band opening + Axel Rudi Pell) back in 2009 , without showing off , RJD told me that one hour of his singing is equal to 2 hours of any other singer ! ever wondered why Dio Disciples has two vocals instead of one ? Ripper said he can't handle a whole of Dio songs on his own. Ironically many people might not know these facts , most of the latest Dio DVD's were recorded while he was sick or ill : 1/ Holy Diver Live he traces of flu as far as I can remember and STILL managed to pull a killer two hours and half set with no freaking intermission ! 2/RCMH , RJD actually caught a very awful infection at Canada in the beginning of the tour and REFUSED to cancel any shows , at RCMH he was starting to recover , people who got to watch the band in Europe later that summer could tell how he sounded way better back then , and still his performance on RCMH puts almost everyone else in the business in complete shame 3/Live At Europe (or Wacken) , well he already had some serious stomach pains at the time , and yet he was absolutely mind blowing on the whole tour. For those interested , my friend once got to ask RJD what was the toughest song to sing with Black Sabbath's live set back in 2009 and the answer ? 'Neon Knights' , anyway I will try to let me friend elaborate more on Ronnie's technique on different songs and versions when I drop her a line sometime soon. Not really , she didn't study RJD's technique for starters , she used to play and sing and we just got to discuss something regarding RJD from which she started explaining everything in details for me , unfortunately she was never a huge fan of Ozzy's voice , but I might drop her some samples and ask her for some analysis , the thing with RJD in particular is that she was a huge fan and got watch him on tour countless times around the world , I believe watching singers up close gives a better perspective on the technique as well , I remember we got to discuss Axel Rudi Pell's lead singer 'Johnny Gioeli' (brilliant singer by the way) and Ripper Owens because they were opening for H&H on their whole German tour leg dates back in 2009. Also for those interested , here is an old cool article of a classic teacher analyzing 5 metal singers Dickinson , Dio , Ozzy , Diamond head and Halford (not knowing any of them) http://www.invisibleoranges.com/2010...metal-singers/ (Just notice that her analysis is based on a single unidentified song by each musician)
    So true! What impressed me most about Dio's singing (aside from his god-like voice itself) was how he sounded so powerful yet made it sound so easy! He could belt long sections of really high notes seemingly effortlessly. Only rock singers coming to wind who had that ability to a same extent are Mercury, Rodgers and Gillan.
    "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
    "Just take a look around you what do you see/Pain, suffering, and misery/It's not the way that the world was planned/It's a pity you don't understand" - Geezer Butler
    "If god is in heaven/How can this happen here" - Phil Lynott (1949-1986)

  10. #50
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    My professional, highly technical opinion is that he was enabled by being fucking awesome.
    ***Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of other internet people, the internet police or the internet in general. It is to be assumed that all sentences are automatically followed by "IMO, BUDDY" as to not offend other internet people and start an internet fight.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by hipster doofus View Post
    My professional, highly technical opinion is that he was enabled by being fucking awesome.

    Here, here. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and technical ability does not always equate to favor. The analysis by the "voice lady" has a problem with it when it comes to the Ozzy analysis. War Pigs is purposefully sung in such way as to sound sinister and heady. I suspect that the song was chosen for that reason, knowing full well that he was going to get a technical fail. Fortunately for Ozzy, War Pigs is clearly a people's choice song, despite its technical considerations. In fact, Ozzy's style, overall, has a sinister flavor to it, and that requires him to sing a certain way to accomplish that sound. For example: "Do you deny, you're responsible, for the victims of the sins you devise?" Compare that to Momma I'm Coming Home, and the non-sinister manner in which those lyrics were sung. Ozzy is not a technical singer, but he still brings something very tangible to the vocal and auditory experience, and his melodies are awesome. And besides, Bob Dylan is still out there singing and people love him. If it wasn't for the fact that there were stage lights on when I last saw Dylan, I would have thought that Kermit the Frog was singing.
    Last edited by Now in Darkness; 07-22-2013 at 12:54 PM.
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  12. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by hipster doofus View Post
    My professional, highly technical opinion is that he was enabled by being fucking awesome.
    I concur, being awesome gives you the ability of hitting higher notes than a mere mortal can:

    "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
    "Just take a look around you what do you see/Pain, suffering, and misery/It's not the way that the world was planned/It's a pity you don't understand" - Geezer Butler
    "If god is in heaven/How can this happen here" - Phil Lynott (1949-1986)

  13. #53
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    On he's pick he has a great range, he's melodies always was great and his timbre was so unique. Early in his career (On Sabbath) he's looked like the devil singing, so melancholy and scary but what is the ozzy vocal range exactly (G♯1-)E♭2-F5(-G♯5) or (G♯1-)B1-F5(-G♯5)?
    Just remeber love is life and hate is living dead
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  14. #54
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    Just to get back to the Dio and head voice thing for a moment, here's a short clip of vocal coach Kevin Richards using head voice for Rob Halford style screaming.


    That's the kind of thing that pops to my mind when people talk about head voice - that and the softer kind of stuff like the Sign of the Southern Cross intro. Neither style sounds like what Dio normally does at all. Now, I'm sure his voice does vibrate in his head - when singing such high notes it has to - but I really don't think it's accurate to say that he sang in head voice exclusively. His usual singing just didn't have that sound that head voice usually does. Whereas bits like the Sign of the Southern Cross intro does.

    Sometimes on stage, when Ronnie's running and jumping around like a maniac :-D , flirting with the front row and not really paying attention, he will accidentally slip into chest voice. When this happens, his volume drops significantly, his vibrato disappears instantly, and he sounds kinda thin, hollow, and insignificant. No surprise, because now he's no longer using the larger part of his resonant cavities. Like when there's a crack in the body of an acoustic guitar, it will make only "plink-plank-plonk" sounds. But he will usually recover from these glitches so quickly, most people never realize what's happening.
    I find this bit a little strange - isn't it a more likely explanation that when Dio would run around, he would get out of breath, therefore momentarily not having his usual tremendous breath support?

    ---------- Post added at 09:48 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:47 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by !Geezer. View Post
    On he's pick he has a great range, he's melodies always was great and his timbre was so unique. Early in his career (On Sabbath) he's looked like the devil singing, so melancholy and scary but what is the ozzy vocal range exactly (G♯1-)E♭2-F5(-G♯5) or (G♯1-)B1-F5(-G♯5)?
    Surely he's never had a four octave range.

  15. #55
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    I don't know, listen to Rainbow LIVE... Dio doesn't always sound so great or even in tune sometimes... Catch The Rainbow, love the Japan live version, blows the Germany one away bcause of Blackmore's guitar he was in the zone that night, but Dio's vocals when he gets to the "Catch The Rainbow, rock the skyyyyiayyyyy! Are almost embarrasing... I don't think of Dio as having a high range at all, I don't care if he was singing from his head, stomack or ass! I like his voice, it was powerful, but mainly his style was unique, completely oposite of Ozzy's who I equally love and more so... but comparing Dio with Freddy Mercury and Rober Plant and Ian Gillan (in their prime) and even Paul Rodgers! That is really a stretch... Dio should have done more softer balladie songs, instead of signing like a crazed maniac all the time... he should have shown more versatility, instead of the same thing over and over...
    Last edited by Wicked Cricket; 07-23-2013 at 11:02 AM.

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    I don't know, listen to Rainbow LIVE... Dio doesn't always sound so great or even in tune sometimes... Catch The Rainbow, love the Japan live version, blows the Germany one away bcause of Blackmore's guitar he was in the zone that night, but Dio's vocals when he gets to the "Catch The Rainbow, rock the skyyyyiayyyyy! Are almost embarrasing... I don't think of Dio as having a high range at all, I don't care if he was singing from his head, stomack or ass! I like his voice, it was powerful, but mainly his style was unique, completely oposite of Ozzy's who I equally love and more so... but comparing Dio with Freddy Mercury and Rober Plant and Ian Gillan (in their prime) and even Paul Rodgers! That is really a stretch... Dio should have done more softer balladie songs, instead of signing like a crazed maniac all the time... he should have shown more versatility, instead of the same thing over and over...
    Yes, I agree. Dio was talented for sure, but his downfall was that he painted himself so tightly into the corner with his often singular vocal style, and single tempo songs. I am not knocking him, but that is what I see as the area where he could have expanded his repertoire, and that is what sets the other vocalists apart from Dio. Its not ability, as much as versatility. Mob Rules was one album where he very much stepped out of that role, and what a great album it was. In many ways, he failed to fully tap into his full resources.
    Last edited by Now in Darkness; 07-23-2013 at 11:07 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    I don't know, listen to Rainbow LIVE... Dio doesn't always sound so great or even in tune sometimes... Catch The Rainbow, love the Japan live version, blows the Germany one away bcause of Blackmore's guitar he was in the zone that night, but Dio's vocals when he gets to the "Catch The Rainbow, rock the skyyyyiayyyyy! Are almost embarrasing... I don't think of Dio as having a high range at all, I don't care if he was singing from his head, stomack or ass! I like his voice, it was powerful, but mainly his style was unique, completely oposite of Ozzy's who I equally love and more so... but comparing Dio with Freddy Mercury and Rober Plant and Ian Gillan (in their prime) and even Paul Rodgers! That is really a stretch... Dio should have done more softer balladie songs, instead of signing like a crazed maniac all the time... he should have shown more versatility, instead of the same thing over and over...
    This I don't agree with at all. I think there was plenty of versatility. And he did have high range - the "bloody angels" part in Neon Knights is what, C#5? (if I have the octave wrong, somebody correct me) And the "Protect your SOUL" in Don't Talk to Strangers a D5? Few people can do that consistently without squealing it in head voice or falsetto. Never heard him go very low, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by IRON-MaN View Post
    From a pure technical perspective ( whether you like RJD or not) , he is definitely a head and shoulder above other guys like Plant , Gillan , Coverdale and Ozzy of course ! it's not about hitting those high notes , its how and when to do it without blowing your voice , RJD's consistency as a singer and performer is quite miraculous to say the least , to be at such age and to perform very technically tough songs on such a hectic schedule and NEVER to have a even close bad night is something truly brilliant !

    Also one of RJD's biggest tricks on stage is how he phrases the songs and words differently from one day to the other , he improvises at times and I love his perfect sense of timing ! always twisting little parts that makes each and every show quite distinctive from one another ! last time I got to hang out with RJD with some common friends was at H&H Germany tour (Ripper solo band opening + Axel Rudi Pell) back in 2009 , without showing off , RJD told me that one hour of his singing is equal to 2 hours of any other singer ! ever wondered why Dio Disciples has two vocals instead of one ? Ripper said he can't handle a whole of Dio songs on his own.
    All of THIS I do agree with entirely.

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    This is a good fun : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meN5FCWT594
    I'm a professional singer and I'm singing teacher and coach for the last 17 years.
    Ozzy has no professional training and proper techniques of singing. He just screams with his heart and have a spectacular melodic sense.
    He sings his ass off in Sabbath Bloody Sabbath and Sabotage. Is just amazing how he sing the high notes and keep it for a long time. It's one peak, is the entire song VERY HIGH!
    But his technical perfection came in No more tears.
    At that time he was singing with great wisdom.
    New colors appeared in his voice. Perfect.
    After the crash of 2003, he lost much of his vocal range. He was for a long time breathing apparatus. This undermines the vocal folds and damage is very apparent in his performance.
    But for me, he still one of the 5 best rock voices in the planet.
    His tone is unique, his melodies are strong and incredibly pop.
    His voice brought heavy music to places it hadn't been before.
    Even without any vocal technique the guy is a genius.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lucius Morthem View Post
    Me too ! I've heard others but, never is too much!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Now in Darkness View Post
    Yes, I agree. Dio was talented for sure, but his downfall was that he painted himself so tightly into the corner with his often singular vocal style, and single tempo songs. I am not knocking him, but that is what I see as the area where he could have expanded his repertoire, and that is what sets the other vocalists apart from Dio. Its not ability, as much as versatility. Mob Rules was one album where he very much stepped out of that role, and what a great album it was. In many ways, he failed to fully tap into his full resources.
    Exactly Wiz ,that's what I was ggetting at, Dio had so much more to give... you nailed it on the head, he failed to fully tap into his full resources, I always got the impression he thought he had to be the heaviest evilist dude on record... but I think it hurt him as much as helped him... let's face it, no one's career scanned as many styles from the doo wop 50's to the honkey tonk 60's and early 70's.. to the heavy metal mountain, I just think he left a lot unchartered that would have made his career much fuller and versatile..

    ---------- Post added at 12:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:21 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    Exactly Wiz ,that's what I was ggetting at, Dio had so much more to give... you nailed it on the head, he failed to fully tap into his full resources, I always got the impression he thought he had to be the heaviest evilist dude on record... but I think it hurt him as much as helped him... let's face it, no one's career scanned as many styles from the doo wop 50's to the honkey tonk 60's and early 70's.. to the heavy metal mountain, I just think he left a lot unchartered that would have made his career much fuller and versatile..
    That said, he nor Ozzy could touch Ian Gillan or Robert Plant in their prime... neither has the soul of a Paul Rodgers... or the operetic range of a Freddy Mercury... Ozzy and Dio are stylists, not great singers...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabiano75 View Post
    After the crash of 2003, he lost much of his vocal range. He was for a long time breathing apparatus. This undermines the vocal folds and damage is very apparent in his performance.
    But for me, he still one of the 5 best rock voices in the planet.
    His tone is unique, his melodies are strong and incredibly pop.
    His voice brought heavy music to places it hadn't been before.
    Even without any vocal technique the guy is a genius.
    Wow, I've actually never thought about that before. Great point!

  21. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabiano75 View Post
    This is a good fun : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meN5FCWT594
    I'm a professional singer and I'm singing teacher and coach for the last 17 years.
    Ozzy has no professional training and proper techniques of singing. He just screams with his heart and have a spectacular melodic sense.
    He sings his ass off in Sabbath Bloody Sabbath and Sabotage. Is just amazing how he sing the high notes and keep it for a long time. It's one peak, is the entire song VERY HIGH!
    But his technical perfection came in No more tears.
    At that time he was singing with great wisdom.
    New colors appeared in his voice. Perfect.
    After the crash of 2003, he lost much of his vocal range. He was for a long time breathing apparatus. This undermines the vocal folds and damage is very apparent in his performance.
    But for me, he still one of the 5 best rock voices in the planet.
    His tone is unique, his melodies are strong and incredibly pop.
    His voice brought heavy music to places it hadn't been before.
    Even without any vocal technique the guy is a genius.
    Exactly, and I would put Dio in the top 5 for heavy metal voices, rock voices, maybe that's a debate, but for heavy metal, it starts and ends with Ozzy and Dio and then there's everyone else... I'mnot saying those 2 are the best "singers", they're the best voices for metal... I can name a doz. btter singers than those 2 off the top of my head just for starts....

  22. #62
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    My top five:
    Ozzy
    Gillan
    Dio
    Plant
    Mercury

    There are many other great voices, but this guys change the way in music with their voices, style and writing talents.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    Exactly, and I would put Dio in the top 5 for heavy metal voices, rock voices, maybe that's a debate, but for heavy metal, it starts and ends with Ozzy and Dio and then there's everyone else... I'mnot saying those 2 are the best "singers", they're the best voices for metal... I can name a doz. btter singers than those 2 off the top of my head just for starts....

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    This has been an interesting thread. I can see the point that Dio was very one dimensional and that hindered his career. His talent is without question but melodically he could be redundant.

    My favorite singer is Ozzy without question and no one touches the emotion he uses but Freddie Mercury was the most talented singer to ever walk this planet. There is Freddie and then everyone else. No one touches him on a talent level.

    Fabiano75, great points on Ozzy with No More Tears. I think NMT and Ozzmosis show a more mature Ozzy that has a huge range and you can clearly hear him singing with more technique. I thought his vocal loss is also attributed to the Grand Mal Seizure he suffered right after Ozzmosis was recorded. I don't think he has ever been the same neurologically or vocally.
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  24. #64
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    Great Top Five 5 amazing singers with completely different styles, but i add one more Rob Halford his style influenced many metal vocalists also and his voice one was of the heavy metal pillars
    Last edited by !Geezer.; 07-23-2013 at 03:53 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    I don't know, listen to Rainbow LIVE... Dio doesn't always sound so great or even in tune sometimes... Catch The Rainbow, love the Japan live version, blows the Germany one away bcause of Blackmore's guitar he was in the zone that night, but Dio's vocals when he gets to the "Catch The Rainbow, rock the skyyyyiayyyyy! Are almost embarrasing... I don't think of Dio as having a high range at all, I don't care if he was singing from his head, stomack or ass! I like his voice, it was powerful, but mainly his style was unique, completely oposite of Ozzy's who I equally love and more so... but comparing Dio with Freddy Mercury and Rober Plant and Ian Gillan (in their prime) and even Paul Rodgers! That is really a stretch... Dio should have done more softer balladie songs, instead of signing like a crazed maniac all the time... he should have shown more versatility, instead of the same thing over and over...
    I really respect your opinion but you must be seriously joking when you've said RJD is ONE DIMENSIONAL ? lol !
    Have you heard any of Ronnie's material pre ELF ? ELF , Rainbow , Dio and Sabbath ? did you check out RJD's side contributions on likes of Roger Glover's 'Buttlerfly Ball' ? Ronnie is actually one of a VERY few singers who sang very different styles and genres with the same quality and consistency ! blues , rock , Hard Rock , Metal and Jazz , what more versatility do you need really ? only other guy that I would consider in the same level as Ronnie is Freddie Mercury (as a musician , front man and live singer) , but I would tip Ronnie over JUST because he had more classic albums with different bands in his pocket than Freddie + he was still on the top of his game when he was 67 years old !

    As for Ronnie not sounding great or out of tune with Rainbow live ? are you serious ? the guy was nothing short from INCREDIBLE ! 'Catch the Rainbow' live was always on the highlights switching from those mellow beautiful lines and then kicking in with power and aggression , people also tend to forget that the Dio/Sabbath music structures have been copied a zillion times later by countless bands , those light and shade intros on songs like 'Children Of the Sea' and 'Falling off the Edge of the world' became almost standard in Rock/Metal music.

    And then you mention comparing Ronnie to Plant and Gillan in their prime is really a stretch ? WHAT ? Ronnie indeed hit some really high notes whenever he wanted to , but he did it with such power that the average listener couldn't really grasp how high they were.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvaeHL6KgKQ

    and then again where are Plant or Gillan compared to Ronnie in the last 20 years or so ? did you watch 'Celebration Day' ? you think that is even comparable to anything live Ronnie did before he passed away back in 2010 ? I really RESPECT Robert Plant for not doing anymore Zeppelin tours , and I really love his versatile and amazing modern albums like the classic 'Raising Sand' with Alison Krauss and 'Mighty Arranger' with The Strange sensation , he sounds more mature , deep and truly understands his limits as a singer , and that's a very smart approach ! as for Gillan , I won't even go there ! no wonder he got on Blackmore's nerves time and time again ! he was incredible at his prime really , a pioneer and one of the greatest of all time ( all of them really) , but comparing his biography and live performances over 45 years with someone as consistent as Ronnie is more of a joke for me !

    With that been said , my current 'living' most favorite rock singer in the business is Chris Cornell , definitely on my top 5 list of all time ! Glenn Hughes is another incredible singer who seemed to get better when he got older ! brilliant live singer as well !
    Last edited by IRON-MaN; 07-23-2013 at 05:34 PM.

  26. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    I don't know, listen to Rainbow LIVE... Dio doesn't always sound so great or even in tune sometimes... Catch The Rainbow, love the Japan live version, blows the Germany one away bcause of Blackmore's guitar he was in the zone that night, but Dio's vocals when he gets to the "Catch The Rainbow, rock the skyyyyiayyyyy! Are almost embarrasing... I don't think of Dio as having a high range at all, I don't care if he was singing from his head, stomack or ass! I like his voice, it was powerful, but mainly his style was unique, completely oposite of Ozzy's who I equally love and more so... but comparing Dio with Freddy Mercury and Rober Plant and Ian Gillan (in their prime) and even Paul Rodgers! That is really a stretch... Dio should have done more softer balladie songs, instead of signing like a crazed maniac all the time... he should have shown more versatility, instead of the same thing over and over...
    Sorry Wicked, but no matter how you try to deny it Dio had a big range, bigger than prime Ozzy's. I don't have the exact note for note figure of Gillan's range, but I'm pretty sure it's not subsgantially bigger than Dio's aside from falsetto notes, that was Gillans domain. Plant always sounded thin and shouty, I don't rank him anywhere near guys like Gillan, Dio and Rodgers. As for Dio's versatility: http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=HJNJElKUxH0
    "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
    "Just take a look around you what do you see/Pain, suffering, and misery/It's not the way that the world was planned/It's a pity you don't understand" - Geezer Butler
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  27. #67
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    Got to disagree with my amigos regarding RJD's range, his forte' was his power, his voice held up over the years pretty dam well, but he never had to scale the heights of a Plant or Gillan, or Mercury, he never impressed me as a soul/blues singer like a Paul Rodgers, he has 2 octaves, Plant, Gillan even a young Ozzy had 3 or 4... Mercury is an opera singer he's not even in this discussion, he's on another planet, but I never found Quuen's music anything I cared for...sure I'm familar with his wide range of "styles", I've got recording from the 50's where he sounds like Del Shannon and the early R&R singers to honky tonkin' Elf stuff... RJD had a very nice soft voice when singing low, like he showed in Rainbow and Sab and some of his solo stuff...but Dio had a limited range, he was not a high octave singer by any stretch.. but I doubt any of the take no prisoners Dio fans would agree... that said, I love Dio's voice but I'm not blinded by fandom to call a spade a spade... Roniie's vocal range was limited to 2 octaves, compare Plant's vocals or Gillans or countless other screamers to RJD, he had a low and midrange register, not a high end scream... it's the reason whenever he sang Ozzy Sab it sounded so bad, because he couldn't hit those notes and his delivery was stacato vs Ozzy's linear smooth melodic delivery... I rest my case on that one, compare Dio singing early Sabbaht with Ozzy and you can see he's clearly out of his element, there's also Zep songs he sang probably DP too and others that Elf covered, you can compare with the originals, RJD rarely did justice to those tunes because his range and style are so different & limited to basically 2 octaves, and he had no feel for the blues... like Plant and Rodgers.. what Dio did best was Dio...I'll leave it at that...
    Last edited by Wicked Cricket; 07-24-2013 at 07:16 AM.

  28. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    Got to disagree with my amigos regarding RJD's range, his forte' was his power, his voice held up over the years pretty dam well, but he never had to scale the heights of a Plant or Gillan, or Mercury, he never impressed me as a soul/blues singer like a Paul Rodgers, he has 2 octaves, Plant, Gillan even a young Ozzy had 3 or 4... Mercury is an opera singer he's not even in this discussion, he's on another planet, but I never found Quuen's music anything I cared for...sure I'm familar with his wide range of "styles", I've got recording from the 50's where he sounds like Del Shannon and the early R&R singers to honky tonkin' Elf stuff... RJD had a very nice soft voice when singing low, like he showed in Rainbow and Sab and some of his solo stuff...but Dio had a limited range, he was not a high octave singer by any stretch.. but I doubt any of the take no prisoners Dio fans would agree... that said, I love Dio's voice but I'm not blinded by fandom to call a spade a spade... Roniie's vocal range was limited to 2 octaves, compare Plant's vocals or Gillans or countless other screamers to RJD, he had a low and midrange register, not a high end scream... it's the reason whenever he sang Ozzy Sab it sounded so bad, because he couldn't hit those notes and his delivery was stacato vs Ozzy's linear smooth melodic delivery... I rest my case on that one, compare Dio singing early Sabbaht with Ozzy and you can see he's clearly out of his element, there's also Zep songs he sang probably DP too and others that Elf covered, you can compare with the originals, RJD rarely did justice to those tunes because his range and style are so different & limited to basically 2 octaves, and he had no feel for the blues... like Plant and Rodgers.. what Dio did best was Dio...I'll leave it at that...
    Sorry mate, but that two octave statement is false. Dio's range was over 3 octaves (C#2-G5) whereas Ozzy's was little under 3 octaves (D#2-D5). And that's not including falsetto notes. RJD sounided really comfortable singing sections of C5, but after D5 notes became pretty shouty. Ozzy started sound really strained when entering the end of the fourth octave. Both had really respectable ranges though, but that's secondary when both had amazing VOICES.
    Last edited by -E5150 StarWanderer-; 07-24-2013 at 12:31 PM.
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  29. #69

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    RJD had a unique voice that for some 'grows on you'. Others like me immediately accept him as a vocal GOD!

    DIO is a low larynxed singer; that means he can hit all the same notes but with more power and chesty tones. He has a good mix of chest voice with head. DIO hits D5s (that's a Tenor!)
    Singers like Mercury and Halford are high larynxed singers! Mercury can only sing classic rock not metal! His voice wouldn't cut through for metal!
    Halford is sort of like a Mercury with grit (granted with higher range than DIO).
    But no voice cuts through like DIO (much more so than Dickinson or Halford or Mercury) All of these singers with the exception of Dickinson in reality have very thin voices! A trademark of the 80s perhaps!

    Finally, a mark of a great singer is live performances. This is where impeccable technique comes into play. Can you sound consistent and solid from the first song to the last song for a 2 hour set night after night! ???
    Most of the singers mentioned here are really bad live! Mercury never hit all the notes he did in the studio live, well cause the studio is over produced! Ozzy... well??? Halford.. notorious for having off days..

    Ahhhhh... There is no one else but DIO left standing!!! Thank you!

    And for the record!!! If you don't hear DIO in Chris Cornell, I got a bridge I want to sell you!!! The first time I ever heard Cornell, I immediately knew that was a copycat of DIO.
    DIO's style, phrasing and everything has been copied by Cornell. Just listen to Spoon man. That's how DIO would sound if DIO were to sing that song. This was also DIO's favorite soundgarden song for obvious reasons!
    Cornell might fool most but not all. Cornell has somehow tapped into the technique of DIO especially in the early days. Now I think he's probably his own man... I'll give him that much.
    Last edited by sinner; 04-12-2014 at 10:53 PM.

  30. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by sinner View Post
    RJD had a unique voice that for some 'grows on you'. Others like me immediately accept him as a vocal GOD!

    DIO is a low larynxed singer; that means he can hit all the same notes but with more power and chesty tones. He has a good mix of chest voice with head. DIO hits D5s (that's a Tenor!)
    Singers like Mercury and Halford are high larynxed singers! Mercury can only sing classic rock not metal! His voice wouldn't cut through for metal!
    Halford is sort of like a Mercury with grit (granted with higher range than DIO).
    But no voice cuts through like DIO (much more so than Dickinson or Halford or Mercury)

    Finally, a mark of a great singer is live performances. This is where impeccable technique comes into play. Can you sound consistent and solid from the first song to the last song for a 2 hour set night after night! ???
    Most of the singers mentioned here are really bad live! Mercury never hit all the notes he did in the studio live, well cause the studio is over produced! Ozzy... well??? Halford.. notorious for having off days..

    Ahhhhh... There is no one else but DIO left standing!!! Thank you!

    And for the record!!! If you don't hear DIO in Chris Cornell, I got a bridge I want to sell you!!! The first time I ever heard Cornell, I immediately knew that was a copycat of DIO.
    DIO's style, phrasing and everything has been copied by Cornell. Just listen to Spoon man. That's how DIO would sound if DIO were to sing that song. This was also DIO's favorite soundgarden song for obvious reasons!
    Cornell might fool most but not all. Cornell has somehow tapped into the technique of DIO especially in the early days. Now I think he's probably his own man... I'll give him that much.
    Cornell sounds a lot more like Howard Werth to me. Don't know if it is a coincidence because I don't really follow Soundgarden enough to know about all of their influences, but the resemblance is uncanny:


  31. #71

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    I can see how you came to that conclusion. I'm not saying DIO is the only influence Cornell might have had. I didn't even know who Howard Werth was but yeah there is a resemblence. Cornell's high notes sound a lot like DIO for example 'outshined', 'spoon man', etc.

  32. #72

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    The idea that Ozzy sang higher and higher until his head exploded is a bit misleading. First 2 albums his high note is a B (Wicked World, Paranoid), on MOR he gets to a C on Sweet Leaf, on vol.IV he hits a C#, hits a D on KYTL, and an E in Megalomania. So there was no single enormous jump, just a small step at a time. He did get higher (dude, I'm sooo high) but who's to say he couldn't sing that high before? The songs didn't call for it. It doesn't sound at all like he struggles with those B's on the first two records.

  33. #73

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    And then those sites that say what the singer's range is are misleading too. The range they give for Ozzy spans the lowest recorded note during his entire career to the highest. Was he actually able to sing that entire range at any one time? Probably not.

  34. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sicko FanAtic View Post
    And then those sites that say what the singer's range is are misleading too. The range they give for Ozzy spans the lowest recorded note during his entire career to the highest. Was he actually able to sing that entire range at any one time? Probably not.
    Well it's pretty impossible to get a definite look of a singers vocal range at specific points of their careers. Of course you could just note watch only his prime years (Vol.4 through NSD!) and see what his range was back then.
    "The consequence of conscience/Is that you'll be left somewhere/Swinging in the air"-Ronnie James Dio (1942-2010) R.I.P. King Of Metal
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  35. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wicked Cricket View Post
    That said, he nor Ozzy could touch Ian Gillan or Robert Plant in their prime... neither has the soul of a Paul Rodgers... or the operetic range of a Freddy Mercury... Ozzy and Dio are stylists, not great singers...
    In his prime Noddy Holder was more powerful and versatile than all of them.

  36. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Now in Darkness View Post
    Here, here. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and technical ability does not always equate to favor. The analysis by the "voice lady" has a problem with it when it comes to the Ozzy analysis. War Pigs is purposefully sung in such way as to sound sinister and heady. I suspect that the song was chosen for that reason, knowing full well that he was going to get a technical fail. Fortunately for Ozzy, War Pigs is clearly a people's choice song, despite its technical considerations. In fact, Ozzy's style, overall, has a sinister flavor to it, and that requires him to sing a certain way to accomplish that sound. For example: "Do you deny, you're responsible, for the victims of the sins you devise?" Compare that to Momma I'm Coming Home, and the non-sinister manner in which those lyrics were sung. Ozzy is not a technical singer, but he still brings something very tangible to the vocal and auditory experience, and his melodies are awesome. And besides, Bob Dylan is still out there singing and people love him. If it wasn't for the fact that there were stage lights on when I last saw Dylan, I would have thought that Kermit the Frog was singing.
    Wiz, people don't go to hear Dylan "sing" it's his lyrics, the message... he could recite them rather than sing and he'd still draw crowds...

  37. #77
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    Paul Rodgers to this day in his 60's hasn't lost a thing on his voice... it's as good or better than ever, I can't think of any other rock singer form the 70's who can even compare quality wise... Gillan, Plant, Ozzy, u name them, they've all lost something... even RJD didn't have the range he had in his younger days...

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    Bills red tights gave him power beyond measure

  39. #79
    fishtowner's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    Many singers have the ability to sing at higher then their normal range but they just don't do it all the time. When you are younger you can get away with it a little more but when you get older your going to pay for it. Plant, Daltry, Jagger just to name a few cant hit those high notes anymore. Hell most of them cant hit the low notes anymore. That why the Stones have those back up singers. I feel sorry for some of the modern metal bands that push it with either the high pitch vocals or the cookie monster screaming type bands. Or both in the same song. In 20 years lets see where some of those guys are.

  40. #80

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    His own natural vocal chords that were well exercised and his youth.

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